social loafing


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social loafing

The tendency of people to curtail their individual efforts when working in a group or collectively and thus to be less productive than when they work alone.

social loafing

a tendency for individuals to exert less effort on a task when working in groups than when they work on the same task alone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Use of these tools could also solve the problem of Free Riding or Social Loafing.
In the Survivor Game, the requirement that every group member must participate makes extreme forms of social loafing impossible.
According to this, manager/supervisor related CCBs increase employees' intentions to quit work, their level of burnout, job stress, social loafing behaviors, and conflict with their colleagues; and decrease their innovative behaviors, identification with the organization, and individual oriented OCBs.
For example, conducting peer assessment was helpful for minimizing social loafing issues, and for enhancing students' perceived fairness of grading and their perception that the grading was accurate (Alden, 2011; Pond, Coates, & Palermo, 2007; Scott, van der Merwe, & Smith, 2005).
Social loafing is an issue that plagues any group of individuals working together, but it isn't the only one.
Social loafing and swimming: Effects of identifiability on individual and relay performance of intercollegiate swimmers.
Many hands make light the work: the causes and consequences of social loafing.
Social loafing in groups is a routine problem (Jassawal la, Sashittal, & Malshe, 2009).
2008 Student Perceptions of Social Loafing in Undergraduate Business Classroom Teams.
Theories include Maslow's hierarchy of needs, flow, mindfulness, personality trait and type theory, theory of mind and emotional intelligence, resilience, groupthink, attractiveness theory, behavioral interviewing, social loafing theory, social learning theory, and organizational justice.
Similarly, Earley (1989) found that social loafing did not occur in groups with collectivistic beliefs (i.