social learning theory


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social learning theory

The theory that learning social standards and behavior occurs by observing and imitating others, e.g., family members, peers, or role models. Social learning also includes conforming, learning in context, and modeling. Theories of social learning were developed by the American psychologist, Albert Bandura, who used them, e.g., to explain the impact of media violence on the behavior of children and adolescents.
See also: theory
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Rotter's social learning theory provides the "blueprint" for this approach.
As already described, according to social learning theory, people self-regulate by setting themselves certain behavioral standards.
Building on social learning theory ( Bandura, 1977; 1986) and collecting data through 40 semi-structured interviews from a European Multinational EU, we empirically showed that ethical leadership helps organizations unlearn destructive behaviors and practices including bribery and the misuse and manipulation of organizational resources for personal gains.
This result is consistent with prior criminological research, which finds that social learning theory is almost always the strongest explanation for criminal behavior, including drug and alcohol use (e.g., Hwang & Akers; Neff & Waite).
The results indicate that Social learning theory has been proven to be the most important factor in the study of digital piracy that occurs over the Internet.
Therefore, drawing on social learning theory it can be proposed that ethical leaders can influence followers' self-efficacy significantly.
Merriam and Caffarella (1999) describe social learning theory as combining elements of behaviorism and cognitivist orientations.
According to social learning theory, attitudes are developed based on observation of key figures in childhood.
Psychologist Albert Bandura, with Richard Walters, publishes his social learning theory, which holds that our actions are shaped not only by anticipated consequences but also by what we see other people doing.
The authors cover the diversity of deviance, researching deviance, anomie/strain theory, social disorganization theory, differential association and social learning theory, social control theories, labeling theory, Marxist/conflict theories, critical theories, the social control of deviance, deviant careers and career deviance, and global perspectives on deviance and social control.