social care


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social care

A generic term for a wide range of non-medical services provided by local authorities and independent bodies, including from the voluntary sector, to support the social needs of individuals, especially the elderly, vulnerable or with special needs, to improve their quality of life. The intent of social care is that an individual lives his or her life as fully and, ideally, as independently as possible.

Examples
Care homes, day centres to help clients with activities of daily living (washing, dressing, feeding or assistance in using the toilet), meals-on-wheels, home care and assistance, care-home and day-centre facilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
The grant is one of 12 totalling GBP2.5 million, supporting new research into social care, as part of NIHR's commitment to improving social care through high quality evidence and building capacity for research in this field.
UNISON has long expressed frustration that the government consistently de-prioritises social care. Since 2010, social care budgets have been cut by [pounds sterling]7.7 billion.
'Every Day Is Different' will locally showcase how rewarding social care careers can be, with a huge array of opportunities for progression and professional development.
Health Foundation director Anita Charlesworth said: "If reform remains unaddressed, social care's inadequacies will continue and people in need will continue to fall through the cracks."
"Instead of taking action, this Tory Government keeps kicking the Green Paper on social care into the long grass when they should be coming forward with a coherent plan to properly fund our care sector."
It is important, therefore, that we do all we can to grow and develop the social care workforce.
This is the 15th year the Skills for Care Accolades have been staged, celebrating the work of some 1.46 million people who work in adult social care.
While some of the income raised could be used to alleviate immediate pressures on social care, Prof Holtham said the remainder should be put into an investment fund to meet future needs - generated from returns on investments made by the fund, which could be fund-managed out of Wales.
Ms Keeley added: "These findings show the astounding scale of the care and support crisis facing both older adults and vulnerable disabled adults who depend on social care to live independently."
The caution has been made in a report on health and social care integration, which was presented at Renfrewshire Council's Leadership Board.
While it's important that the Government has recognised that social care underfunding lies at the heart of our hospitals' winter pressures, the amount committed is a let-down - less than 10% of what's needed to fix the social care crisis now.