social capital


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social capital

(sō′shĭl) [L. socialis]
Community assets, i.e., interpersonal networks, bonds, and institutions that support communities, maintain their cohesiveness, and help them weather crises.
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding and definition of social capital above can then be used as a basis to summarize the understanding of social capital as aspects of social networks owned by individuals and communities that allow individuals to take action to achieve the desired goals.
Further, according to Bourdieu, social capital is a resource that is contained in individuals and groups of people connected in a network (network), related in relation that is both institutional and non-institutional, and mutually beneficial to each other.
Besides that, it would be highly valuable to consider various aspects of social capital when taking policy decisions.
Based on the preceding discussion, we proposed that both internal and external social capital would play a negative mediating role in the relationship between ESE and the firm's innovation behavior.
The key concerns of this paper are: What is the role of social capital in the context of weak formal institutions of local governance in Pakistan?
First, and most importantly, it innovates in investigating the role of different dimensions of social capital in shaping consumers' perceptions of their borrowing constraints.
There have been attempts to connect social capital with space syntax.
To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies that have considered how the interaction between the institutional environment (of developed and developing countries) and the stocks of social capital considered in their different forms (individual, network and institutional) influence an LG's capability for reducing the transaction costs and risks for MFIs.
For the purpose of advancing social capital and actualizing its advantages, workers have to grasp, count on, and reciprocate social capital.
3) This paper, therefore, is an exploratory analysis, aided by the collation of literature and empirical data, of the dimensions and risk for socially mobile Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and households in social capital terms.
In the last few decades Social Capital (Coleman 1988 Burt 1992 Putnam 1996) has attracted quite an extensive intellectual discussion.