tenure

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tenure

Academia A status granted to a person with a 'terminal' degree–eg, doctor of medicine–MD or doctor of philosophy–PhD, after a trial period, which protects him/her from summary dismissal; tenured academicians are expected to assume major duties in research, teaching and, if applicable, Pt care fostering, through their activities, the academic 'agenda' of their respective departments or institutions. See Endowed chair, Lecturer, Professor. Cf Chair.

tenure

(tĕn′yĕr) [L. tenēre, to hold]
1. The holding of a property, place, or occupational assignment.
2. The specification that an employee (typically someone in an academic setting) may hold a position permanently unless he or she behaves with gross negligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
(5) Known as commutation, this new process allowed for the transformation of use rights to a property held under feudal tenure into franc alleu, a French equivalent to English free and common socage. Each commutation generated a notarized deed and these documents provide a unique, albeit partial, description of property holdings and values for mid-nineteenth-century Montreal.
Moreover, if he held by military service or in socage, he could avoid payment of feudal incidents.(13) Since the courts of common law would neither enforce the use, nor interpret it, they were unable to provide legal remedy in the case of feoffees who failed to carry out their instructions.
In Lower Canada, according to Bouchette, there are two tenures,--the feudal and the socage. Tenanciers, censitaires, or holders of land en roture pay a small annual rent to the seigneurs, to which "is added some articles of provision, such as a couple of fowls, or a goose, or a bushel of wheat." "They are also bound to grind their corn at the moulin banal, or the lord's mill, where one fourteenth part of it is taken for his use" as toll.
More distant fields were tilled by serfs or bondsmen who lived on this land and who were bound to socage service (i.e., they had to work a fixed number of hours a week on the main fields of the manor) or certain imposts.
The knight was a member of the landed gentry, especially after the imposition of feudalism and socage tenure by the Normans after 1066.