Snowshoe

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Snowshoe

a recently recognized cat breed; it is a medium- to large-sized cat with blue eyes, and coat color similar to a sealpoint or bluepoint Siamese, but with a white nose, chin, and ventral midline, and white boots on all feet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Snowshoeing: Professional winter guide and naturalist, David Walp, leads snowshoeing excursions, departing from River House Community Center, 301 N.
NZ Snowshoeing believes "If you can walk, you can snowshoe".
Unfortunately, in the UK very few people get the chance to have a go at snowshoeing, which is a pity as it's a fantastic way of getting around in snowy conditions.
When snowshoeing uphill, you want to press down on the front of your boots and snowshoes to help the crampons under your toes grip the snow ahead of you.
The winter of 2006-07, my girls were ready to try snowshoeing for themselves, so we bought each of them a pair of snowshoes for Christmas.
For snowshoeing and cross-country skiing, you'll want several layers and a waterproof jacket and pants to keep you dry in case you're caught in nasty weather or take a spill in the snow, which is pretty likely given the awkward mechanics of both sports.
People have been snowshoeing for over 6,000 years (the practice probably originated in Central Asia), and as early as the eighteenth century, snowshoeing had become a recreational and fitness sport.
The benefits One hour of snowshoeing can burn about 600 calories (more than running at the same pace), and there's little chance of injury, thanks to the low impact.
Snowshoeing into the backcountry, especially alone, is not for the faint of heart.
Around 1840, twelve men from Montreal began meeting every Saturday to go "tramping" (that's what they called snowshoeing back then).
No matter what kind of 'shoes you choose, snowshoeing comes down to waddling like a fat duck in waist-deep snow with a loaded pack on your back.