snow

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car·bon di·ox·ide snow

solid carbon dioxide used in the treatment of warts, lupus, nevi, and other skin affections, and as a refrigerant.
Synonym(s): dry ice
Drug slang A popular street term for any pulverised whitish substance of abuse which can be snorted, classically cocaine, but also heroin, amphetamine, oxycodone, etc.
Vox populi Cold crystallised white precipitation

snow

Drug slang A street term for a pulverized substance of abuse which can be snorted, classically, cocaine, but also heroin, amphetamine, oxycodone, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
What drives basin scale spatial variability of snowpack properties in northern Colorado?
Therefore, this study separated the WUS into six watersheds and selected eight snow metrics to both investigate the relationships among the snow metrics and streamflow and to determine the lead correlation between the snowpack and streamflow in each watershed.
Refraction of the radar beam in the snow/air interface is caused by the presence of dry snowpack, and the index of refraction is related to the density and permittivity of the snow [20].
"This snowpack is ripe, It's ready to melt,'' said Mr.
The snowpack maps enabled them to achieve near-perfect water operations during the driest year in California history.
As in Oregon, which depends on Cascade Range winter snowpack for much of the water in the populous Willamette Valley, there may be significant impacts on ecosystems, agriculture, hydropower, industry, municipalities and recreation, especially in summer when water demands peak.
I expected to find that heavy snowpack would increase water depth and make a pothole pond more suitable for C.
The positive revenue forecast also took into account continued cost-containment and an expectation for average snowpack.
The rain, along with higher than normal groundwater saturation due to snowpack melt, caused many waterways in the region to spill over their banks and flood.
Above-normal snowpack and torrential rains in recent weeks have raised flooding fears along the Missouri, one of the world s longest rivers at 2,340 miles (3,766 kilometers).
"Given the a high amount of water in the current snowpack and the saturated or frozen ground conditions, the potential for a major flood is higher than normal if a significant rain event occurs along with a rapid spring snow melt," said Stephanie Shifflett, a GRCA water resources engineer, in a recent press release.
Researchers at the University of Washington have found that between 1950 and the end of the century, the amount of water contained in snowpack in the Rocky Mountains has declined by almost 16 percent.