snow

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car·bon di·ox·ide snow

solid carbon dioxide used in the treatment of warts, lupus, nevi, and other skin affections, and as a refrigerant.
Synonym(s): dry ice

snow

(sno) a freezing or frozen mixture consisting of discrete particles or crystals.
carbon dioxide snow  solid carbon dioxide, formed by rapid evaporation of liquid carbon dioxide; it gives a temperature of about −79°C (−110°F). It is used in cryotherapy to freeze and anesthetize the skin and, in the form of a slush (carbon dioxide slush), as an escharotic to destroy skin lesions and as a peeling agent for chemabrasion.
Drug slang A popular street term for any pulverised whitish substance of abuse which can be snorted, classically cocaine, but also heroin, amphetamine, oxycodone, etc.
Vox populi Cold crystallised white precipitation

snow

Drug slang A street term for a pulverized substance of abuse which can be snorted, classically, cocaine, but also heroin, amphetamine, oxycodone, etc

snow

a freezing or frozen mixture consisting of discrete particles or crystals.

carbon dioxide snow
the solid formed by rapid evaporation of liquid carbon dioxide, giving a temperature of about −110°F (−79°C); used locally in various skin conditions. See also carbon dioxide snow.
snow leopard
see snow leopard.
snow nose
see nasal depigmentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
He wouldn't say it was over just yet, but rather that the snowpack will bring some drought relief.
Losing 85 percent of that snowpack severely threatens the ability for California to rely on melted snowpack as a primary source of drinking water," said Neil Berg, a UCLA researcher and author of the study.
He said they've been out three times this year and they will probably got out again this week to see what the predicted rain does to the snowpack.
For 14 y, including the low snowpack years of 1987 and 2001, only Diaptomus shoshone was present; for 8 y, including the heavy snowpack years of 1996 and 1997, only C.
In mid-May, mountain snowpack was fair in some places.
Observations of the sediment on channel snowpack were primarily photographic prior to 2005.
One experiment involves dropping a 10-pound bag of snow onto the snowpack.
Ring-width chronologies of these species correlate positively with summer temperature and the PDO, and correlate negatively with winter precipitation, spring snowpack depth, and glacier mass balance (Lewis, 2001; Peterson and Peterson, 2001; Gedalof et al.
Once weather conditions set up weak layers in a snowpack, all it takes to start a slide is a little extra pressure (force applied over an area) to crush the weak layer and send the slab sliding off the top.
The glaciers are shrinking more and more every year and there is much less snowpack to feed the rivers.
Almost all but the smallest avalanches stem from weak layers of snow that either evolve within the snowpack or form at the surface and are buried by subsequent snowfall or windblown drifts.