snow

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car·bon di·ox·ide snow

solid carbon dioxide used in the treatment of warts, lupus, nevi, and other skin affections, and as a refrigerant.
Synonym(s): dry ice

snow

(sno) a freezing or frozen mixture consisting of discrete particles or crystals.
carbon dioxide snow  solid carbon dioxide, formed by rapid evaporation of liquid carbon dioxide; it gives a temperature of about −79°C (−110°F). It is used in cryotherapy to freeze and anesthetize the skin and, in the form of a slush (carbon dioxide slush), as an escharotic to destroy skin lesions and as a peeling agent for chemabrasion.
Drug slang A popular street term for any pulverised whitish substance of abuse which can be snorted, classically cocaine, but also heroin, amphetamine, oxycodone, etc.
Vox populi Cold crystallised white precipitation

snow

Drug slang A street term for a pulverized substance of abuse which can be snorted, classically, cocaine, but also heroin, amphetamine, oxycodone, etc

snow

a freezing or frozen mixture consisting of discrete particles or crystals.

carbon dioxide snow
the solid formed by rapid evaporation of liquid carbon dioxide, giving a temperature of about −110°F (−79°C); used locally in various skin conditions. See also carbon dioxide snow.
snow leopard
see snow leopard.
snow nose
see nasal depigmentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Bijeasnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the snow cover is almost 2 meters.
When assessing the meteorological situation in Bashkortostan in January-early February, I want to draw the attention of agricultural producers to the fact that today's snow cover indicators differ by several times from the average multi-year values ?
ESA is planning on improving the satellite-based record of global snow cover with the upcoming ESA's Climate Change Initiative.
From snow cover depletion curves, it is evident that snow started melting in Zone#2-6 from early March.
Figure 1 also shows that the lead concentration in snow cover Schuchinsk in northern Kazakhstan did not exceed the maximum allowable rate (MAR).
Monitoring snow cover variability in an agropastoral area in the Trans Himalayan region of Nepal using MODIS data with improved cloud removal methodology, Remote Sensing of Environment 115(5): 1234-1246.
The effects will be especially profound along the trailing edge of the cryosphere in regions that experience significant, but seasonal snow cover," the Wisconsin scientists assert in their report.
June snow cover is found to be falling much faster than expected from climate models, and is disappearing even quicker than summertime Arctic sea-ice.
This prediction, coupled with our current imprecise understanding of the impacts of snow cover on arctic ungulates (Tyler 2010), makes it imperative to find tools that could rectify the scarcity of data about snow-cover conditions within the winter ranges of arctic tundra ungulates.
While the ARS analysis shows that there have been changes in the high-elevation snow cover, these are relatively minor compared to the effect that warming has had on the mid and low elevations.
Continuous below freezing temperatures during January and February led to a snow cover in central and northern Illinois that persisted from late December unto the end of February.