snore

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snore

(snōr),
1. A rough, rattling, inspiratory noise produced by vibration of the pendulous palate, or sometimes of the vocal folds, during sleep or coma.
See also: stertor, rhonchus.
2. To breathe noisily, or with a snore.
[A.S. snora]

snore

(snor)
1. rough, noisy breathing during sleep, due to vibration of the uvula and soft palate.
2. to produce such sounds during sleep.

snore

(snôr)
intr.v. snored, snoring, snores
To breathe during sleep with harsh, snorting noises caused by vibration of the soft palate.
n.
1. The act or an instance of snoring.
2. The noise so produced.

snor′er n.

snore

[snôr]
a harsh, rough sound of breathing caused by vibration of the uvula and soft palate during sleep.

snore

Snoring Sleep disorders A harsh buzzing noise in a sleeper, produced primarily with inspiration during sleep due to vibration of soft palate and pillars of oropharyngeal inlet; snoring ↑ with age; it affects 60% of ♂, 40% of ♀; many snorers have incomplete obstruction of upper airway, and may develop obstructive sleep apnea; it is associated with ↑ risk of HTN, coronary ischemia, CVAs; alcoholism, arthritis, asthma, daytime drowsiness, depression, DM, insomnia, obesity World record A Swede who saws wood at 93 dB Management Isolated snoring needs no treatment; it may be ↓ with a nasal dilator, or surgery to tighten redundant soft palate. See Obstructive sleep anpea syndrome. Cf Sleep disorders, Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.

snore

(snōr)
1. A rough, rattling inspiratory noise produced by vibration of the pendulous palate, or sometimes of the vocal cords, during sleep or coma.
See also: stertor, rhonchus
2. To breathe noisily, or with a snore.
[A.S. snora]

Patient discussion about snore

Q. In what way snoring is related to ADHD? My 5 year old son snores at night. He has disturbed sleep too and as a result the very next morning he remains sleepy for the day. This makes him tired and he is showing the signs of denial to go to school and make excuses. I have taken him to the doctor for the snoring problem. After some rounds of check up and some tests and with the help of a psychologist he was confirmed for ADHD. In what way snoring is related to ADHD?

A. Sleep apnea (while asleep the person stop breathing occasionally) in children has been linked to growth problems, ADHD, poor school performance, learning difficulties, bedwetting, and high blood pressure. it is a serious matter, if you did a sleep study - it probably shown up if he has it. not all children that snores have sleep apnea.

More discussions about snore
References in periodicals archive ?
NOSE SNORER THIS is when the nostrils either collapse or are congested, causing the airway to be blocked.
Mr Carr Smith said: "We hope that our campaign will provide women with a stepping stone to learn more about snoring, its causes and how you can help reduce it as well as giving people the chance to talk to other snorers.
Persistent snorers had significantly higher prenatal and childhood cotinine levels than did either of the other two groups at both time points.
Dr Tom Mackay says overweight snorers should try to lose weight, as well as establishing good sleep routines and sleep hygiene.
More serious medical conditions, such as bradyarrhythmia and hypertension, have also been diagnosed in snorers.
Nearly 31% of the women were habitual snorers in their last trimester.
A formal diagnosis of GDM was made in 24% of the habitual snorers and 17% of nonsnorers, a significant difference.
Graham Carr Smith, from Help Stop Snoring, which organises the boot camp, said: "With more than 15 million snorers in the UK alone, we're pretty sure there must be a good deal of tired and grumpy partners in Birmingham who are desperate for a peaceful night's sleep.
She lined up alongside four other snorers from across the UK and took orders from a leading ear, nose and throat specialist, a professional personal trainer and a diet expert, in an attempt to combat their snoring problem for good.
AN army-style drill sergeant is heading to the Midlands to cure SNORERS.
A Hungarian study of more than 12,000 people ages 18 to 80 found that heavy snorers were 34 percent more likely to have heart trouble and 67 percent more likely to suffer a stroke than people who do not snore.