sniff

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sniff

(snĭf)
v. sniffed, sniffing, sniffs
v.intr.
1.
a. To inhale a short, audible breath through the nose, as in smelling something.
b. To sniffle.
2. To use the sense of smell, as in savoring or investigating: sniffed at the jar to see what it held.
3. To regard something in a contemptuous or dismissive manner: The critics sniffed at the adaptation of the novel to film.
4. Informal To pry; snoop: The reporters came sniffing around for more details.
v.tr.
1. To inhale forcibly through the nose: sniffed the cool morning air.
2. To smell, as in savoring or investigating: sniffed the lilacs; sniffed the breeze for traces of smoke.
3. To perceive or detect by or as if by sniffing: dogs that sniffed out the trail through the snow; sniffed trouble ahead.
4. To utter in a contemptuous or haughty manner: The countess sniffed her disapproval.
n.
1. An instance or the sound of sniffing.
2. Something sniffed or perceived by or as if by sniffing; a whiff: a sniff of perfume; a sniff of scandal.

sniff′a·ble adj.
sniff′er n.

sniff

(snif)
1. To inhale through the nostrils with the mouth closed.
2. To smell in short, quick inhalations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The court ruled that a warrantless narcotics-dog sniff of the door did not constitute a search under the Fourth Amendment and did not violate the Minnesota Constitution.
Snipe the dog, sniffs different jars filled with water, in Warrington where he is training to detect underground water leaks by smelling chlorine traces
When n [greater than or equal to] 2, attack sniffs more than 1 node in the network.
Sniffs can be in or out, strong or shallow, long or short; and this gives the device's developers the opportunity to create a complex 'language' with multiple signals.
MEET Flash the Dutch wonder dog who has single-pawedly sniffed out millions of euro worth of fake cigarettes destined for Irish streets.
A more interesting part of Souter's dissent is this observation: The Court today does not go so far as to say explicitly that sniff searches by dogs trained to sense contraband always get a free pass under the Fourth Amendment since it reserves judgment on the constitutional significance of sniffs assumed to he more intrusive than a dog's walk around a stopped car....
That's because people use their noses to sniff imaginary as well as real aromas, and the mere act of sniffing scentless air kick-starts odor perception, a new study finds.
In only a few weeks, Aialik learned to stick his nose in the hole and sniff. If he smells something, he's to move his nose to the 1.
Pellet or flake samples are heated in a jar, and the sensor "sniffs" the air in the head space.
(28) Quite a few published appellate opinions involve K-9 sniffs conducted in a variety of public places.
[43] While the Supreme Court has never addressed the issue of whether a dog sniff of a person constitutes a search, one Justice has stated that: "I have expressed the view that dog sniffs of people constitute searches." [44] Cases addressing the use of narcotics dogs to sniff school children and detect drugs have generally held that the use of such dogs is an unconstitutional search, although one court found such a sniff was not a search.
"An expectant mother sniffs solvent to the probable detriment of her unborn child.