sneeze

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sneeze

 [snēz]
1. an involuntary, sudden, violent, and audible expulsion of air through the mouth and nose.
2. to expel air in such a manner. Sneezing is usually caused by the irritation of sensitive nerve endings in the mucous membrane that lines the nose. Allergies, drafts of cold air, and even bright light can produce sneezing. Sneezing and coughing are similar in that both are reflex actions and are preceded by quick inhalations, although a cough may also be deliberate, to clear the throat or bronchi. In a sneeze, the glottis is momentarily closed after air is inhaled and the tongue is pressed against the roof of the mouth. When the glottis is suddenly opened, part of the air goes through the nose and, when the tongue is released, part goes through the mouth; in this way mucus and other irritants are expelled from the nose.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sneeze

(snēz),
1. To expel air from the nose and mouth by an involuntary spasmodic contraction of the muscles of expiration.
2. An act of sneezing; a reflex excited by an irritation of the mucous membrane of the nose or, sometimes, by a bright light striking the eye.
[A.S. fneōsan]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sneeze

(snēz)
intr.v. sneezed, sneezing, sneezes
To expel air forcibly from the mouth and nose in an explosive, spasmodic involuntary action resulting chiefly from irritation of the nasal mucous membrane.
n.
An instance or the sound of sneezing.

sneez′er n.
sneez′y adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
An abrupt and involutary explosive expulsion of air from the lungs through opened glottis into the nose and mouth, in response to various irritants
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sneeze

Sternutation An abrupt and involutary explosive expulsion of air from the lungs through opened glottis into the nose and mouth, in response to various irritants World record sneezing On 1/1/81, a girl in the UK began sneezing and continued for 977 consecutive days, sneezing ±1 million times in the first 365 days
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sneeze

(snēz)
1. To expel air from the nose and mouth by an involuntary spasmodic contraction of the muscles of expiration.
2. An act of sneezing; a reflex excited by an irritation of the mucous membrane of the nose or, sometimes, when a bright light strikes the eye.
[A.S. fneōsan]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sneeze

(snēz)
1. To expel air from nose and mouth by an involuntary spasmodic contraction of muscles of expiration.
2. Reflex excited by an irritation of the mucous membrane of nose or, sometimes, by a bright light striking the eye.
[A.S. fneōsan]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about sneeze

Q. i LOVE cats! but whenever I get near them I start sneezing like crazy Is there something I can take that will prevent this allergic reaction? cause I'm just dying to get a fluffy little kitty...

A. i know a guy who's going through an anti-allergy treatment (for the last year and a half). he is going every month or so and get a shot. i think this is the treatment:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/allergy-shots/AA00017/METHOD=print

Q. why do allergy effects comes usually in sorts of sneezing and scratching and more other thing like that?

A. It's because the substances released in the allergic reaction of the immune system to the allergen, like histamine, cause sensation of itching. They also cause increased secretion of mucus from the lining of the throat, which irritates the airway and cause sneezing.

You may read more here:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histamine

Q. Can a pet allergy cause your nose to plug, give you a sore throat and a bad cough? I recently adopted a puppy. I felt fine for about a week an a half, but 2 days ago I began to sneeze a lot. My nose plugged and I had to blow almost constantly. I also came down with a sore throat and a bad cough. Is this a result of a pet allergy or did I just come down with a cold? I've been around dogs all my life and I don't ever recall reacting like this before.

A. It can happen. Go to the doctor, if you want to know for sure. See a veterinarian for tips on making your dog more hypoallergenic. There are ways to take care of a dog and not have so many allergy issues. :D Good luck.

More discussions about sneeze
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References in periodicals archive ?
At some point as humans evolved, migrated, formed communities, grew civilizations, developed new languages, excelled at invention, and invented the Taco Bell Cool Ranch Doritos Locos Taco, we all either collectively or unconsciously agreed that when another person sneezed, we had to respond with some bark of well-meaning reassurance.
Since nobody really takes a couple of days EoACAyoff' because of a common cold, I quietly sneezed in my tissues at my workplace.
Awdry's Thomas the Tank Engine Railway Series (first published in the 1940s); t'shoo in Angela McAllister's The King Who Sneezed (1988); and atishooo in Margaret Malay's The Horribly Haunted School (1997), in which a boy is allergic to ghosts.
During her first year of sneezing, Donna sneezed about one million times.
He said: ''I felt a tingling in my nose and sneezed as I was approaching the crossing and I got my handkerchief out.
"Droplets spread happens when germs travelling inside droplets that are coughed or sneezed from a sick person enter the eyes, nose, or mouth of another person," as written from (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/infections-spread-by-air-or-droplets.pdf) the poster .
Gurkha Gurung, 45, told how he sneezed four to five times as he overtook a car at 74mph on a dual carriageway.
Cold and flu viruses are spread by droplets that are sneezed or coughed out by an infected person.
A MAN who was shot in the head sneezed out the bullet.
A couple of years ago on my bus a lady sneezed onto the back of the head of the lady in front.
He tipped his head toward his elbow, and reaching across his face, sneezed into the inner part of his elbow.
DOCTORS have operated on a young woman who could have died if she laughed or sneezed.