sneeze


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sneeze

 [snēz]
1. an involuntary, sudden, violent, and audible expulsion of air through the mouth and nose.
2. to expel air in such a manner. Sneezing is usually caused by the irritation of sensitive nerve endings in the mucous membrane that lines the nose. Allergies, drafts of cold air, and even bright light can produce sneezing. Sneezing and coughing are similar in that both are reflex actions and are preceded by quick inhalations, although a cough may also be deliberate, to clear the throat or bronchi. In a sneeze, the glottis is momentarily closed after air is inhaled and the tongue is pressed against the roof of the mouth. When the glottis is suddenly opened, part of the air goes through the nose and, when the tongue is released, part goes through the mouth; in this way mucus and other irritants are expelled from the nose.

sneeze

(snēz),
1. To expel air from the nose and mouth by an involuntary spasmodic contraction of the muscles of expiration.
2. An act of sneezing; a reflex excited by an irritation of the mucous membrane of the nose or, sometimes, by a bright light striking the eye.
[A.S. fneōsan]

sneeze

(snēz)
1. to expel air forcibly and spasmodically through the nose and mouth.
2. an involuntary, sudden, violent, and audible expulsion of air through the mouth and nose.

sneeze

(snēz)
intr.v. sneezed, sneezing, sneezes
To expel air forcibly from the mouth and nose in an explosive, spasmodic involuntary action resulting chiefly from irritation of the nasal mucous membrane.
n.
An instance or the sound of sneezing.

sneez′er n.
sneez′y adj.

sneeze

Etymology: AS, snesen, to sneeze
a sudden forceful involuntary expulsion of air through the nose and mouth occurring as a result of irritation to the mucous membranes of the upper respiratory tract, such as by dust, pollen, or viral inflammation. Also called sternutation.
An abrupt and involutary explosive expulsion of air from the lungs through opened glottis into the nose and mouth, in response to various irritants

sneeze

Sternutation An abrupt and involutary explosive expulsion of air from the lungs through opened glottis into the nose and mouth, in response to various irritants World record sneezing On 1/1/81, a girl in the UK began sneezing and continued for 977 consecutive days, sneezing ±1 million times in the first 365 days

sneeze

(snēz)
1. To expel air from the nose and mouth by an involuntary spasmodic contraction of the muscles of expiration.
2. An act of sneezing; a reflex excited by an irritation of the mucous membrane of the nose or, sometimes, when a bright light strikes the eye.
[A.S. fneōsan]

sneeze

(snēz)
1. To expel air from nose and mouth by an involuntary spasmodic contraction of muscles of expiration.
2. Reflex excited by an irritation of the mucous membrane of nose or, sometimes, by a bright light striking the eye.
[A.S. fneōsan]

sneeze,

n an involuntary, sudden, violent expulsion of air through the oral cavity and nose; may be elicited during thiopental (Pentothal) anesthesia by corneal stimulation.

sneeze

1. an involuntary, sudden, violent, and audible expulsion of air through the mouth and nose.
2. to expel air in such a manner. Sneezing is usually caused by the irritation of sensitive nerve endings in the mucous membrane that lines the nose. Allergies, drafts of cold air, and even bright light can produce sneezing. It is a predominant sign in inclusion body rhinitis in piglets, atrophic rhinitis in older pigs, and feline rhinotracheitis.

sneeze counts
number of sneezes per pig per minute. Used as an indicator of the presence or absence of upper respiratory disease in a piggery—greater than 0.33 sneezes per pig per minute accepted as an indication of rhinitis in pigs.
reverse sneeze
sporadic, brief periods of noisy, labored inspiratory effort seen in dogs that are otherwise normal. Postnasal drip, nasopharyngeal spasm, and entrapment of the epiglottis have been suggested as causes.

Patient discussion about sneeze

Q. i LOVE cats! but whenever I get near them I start sneezing like crazy Is there something I can take that will prevent this allergic reaction? cause I'm just dying to get a fluffy little kitty...

A. i know a guy who's going through an anti-allergy treatment (for the last year and a half). he is going every month or so and get a shot. i think this is the treatment:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/allergy-shots/AA00017/METHOD=print

Q. why do allergy effects comes usually in sorts of sneezing and scratching and more other thing like that?

A. It's because the substances released in the allergic reaction of the immune system to the allergen, like histamine, cause sensation of itching. They also cause increased secretion of mucus from the lining of the throat, which irritates the airway and cause sneezing.

You may read more here:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histamine

Q. Can a pet allergy cause your nose to plug, give you a sore throat and a bad cough? I recently adopted a puppy. I felt fine for about a week an a half, but 2 days ago I began to sneeze a lot. My nose plugged and I had to blow almost constantly. I also came down with a sore throat and a bad cough. Is this a result of a pet allergy or did I just come down with a cold? I've been around dogs all my life and I don't ever recall reacting like this before.

A. It can happen. Go to the doctor, if you want to know for sure. See a veterinarian for tips on making your dog more hypoallergenic. There are ways to take care of a dog and not have so many allergy issues. :D Good luck.

More discussions about sneeze
References in periodicals archive ?
I realised a sneeze was coming, and so I began my usual routine when I am aware that a sneeze is coming, a frantic search upon my person for some sort of tissue or handkerchief, but done in such a way that the rest of my body is fooled into thinking I do not know a sneeze is coming.
Cats with respiratory infections may sneeze and can often (but not always) have other symptoms, such as runny eyes or a runny nose.
Then you have "photic sneeze reflex" or a "solar sneeze".
One should try to sneeze without sounding ridiculous and avoid stifling himself or spraying his immediate vicinity with germs.
The sneeze most memorable to me happened when I was a kid in the seventh grade.
Centres for Disease Control and Prevention or CDC is out with a poster on Oct 27 saying that Ebola virus can spread through sneeze and cough droplets.
Professor Ronald Eccles, director of Britain's Common Cold Centre, which is based at Cardiff University, said it was "impossible" for people to sneeze with their eyes open.
The study revealed that the smaller droplets that emerge in a cough or sneeze may travel five to 200 times further than they would if those droplets simply moved as groups of unconnected particles.
It's a send-up, and simplicity itself: Three men in business suits, each with a farcically misshapen, pink-tinted nose, sneeze irrepressibly.
The idea of covering your nose when you sneeze originated during the days of the Black Death.
He goes with his mum to the library, but luckily, the dusty books don't make him sneeze.
The precise location of the sneeze center in the human brain has not been definitively identified.