snap

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snap

 [snap]
a short, sharp sound.
opening snap a short, sharp, high-pitched click occurring in early diastole and caused by opening of the mitral cusps, a characteristic sound in mitral stenosis.

snap

(snap),
A click; a short sharp sound; said especially of cardiac sounds.

snap

Cardiology noun A click or other sharp sound corresponding to an abnormal mitral valve opening–opening snap, or closing–closing snap Psychiatry verb To suffer abrupt decompensation in social or interpersonal coping mechanisms. See Postal worker syndrome.

snap

(snap)
A click; a short, sharp sound; said especially of cardiac sounds.

SNAP

Abbrev. for SCORE FOR NEONATAL ACUTE PHYSIOLOGY.
References in periodicals archive ?
To determine whether alligator snapping turtles and eastern snapping turtles used macrohabitat differentially, we conducted a 6 x 2 chi-square test to compare the number of each species of turtle captured within each watershed.
We captured 51 alligator snapping turtles (not including three recaptured individuals), and 27 eastern snapping turtles.
The DFA revealed a significant difference between locations where alligator snapping turtles and eastern snapping turtles were trapped (F = 2.097, n = 59, P = 0.009; Fig.
Alligator snapping turtles were trapped significantly more often in sites with greater physical structure, such as many overhanging roots and structure at the surface and underwater (physical structure classified as number 2), whereas eastern snapping turtles were trapped at sites characterized by minimal physical structure (physical structure classified as number 1) (U = 195.5, nl = 18, n2 = 42, P < 0.05; Table 7).
For snapping turtles, laying lots of eggs helps ensure that some of those eggs will hatch, and maybe a few of those turtles will manage surviving to adulthood.
The female snapping turtle, like her other turtle kin, does not guard the nest or the young.
Snapping turtles are assumed to be predators because of their hooked beaks and dangerous reputation.
The common snapping turtle has a reputation for having a nasty attitude.
Forty adult snapping shrimp (Alpheus heterochaelis, length from rostrum tip to telson = 2.5-5.1 cm; 18 males and 22 females) were used in our behavioral experiments.
A snapping shrimp met the same conspecific only once and was usually tested no more than once a day.
Each snapping interaction was characterized by the latency between a preceding tactile interaction and the snap (disregarding durations of 5 s or more); the cocking duration, i.e.
The body axis angle [Beta] between the longitudinal body axes of the interacting animals (ranging from 0 [degrees] to [+ or -] 180 [degrees], positive when ipsilateral to the snapper claw of the snapping animal and negative when contralateral to it; see [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1A OMITTED]).