smallpox vaccine


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small·pox vac·cine

vaccine of live vaccinia virus suspensions prepared from cutaneous vaccinial lesions of calves (calf lymph) or chick embryo origin; not currently used because of the worldwide elimination of smallpox.

small·pox vac·cine

(smawlpoks vak-sēn)
Vaccine of live vaccinia virus suspensions prepared from cutaneous vaccinial lesions of calves (calf lymph) or chick embryo origin; not currently used because of the worldwide elimination of smallpox.

smallpox vaccine

A vaccine used to provide immunity against smallpox. The vaccine is made from live vaccinia virus (not from the smallpox virus). Similarities between the two viruses make the vaccine about 95% effective in preventing smallpox in those exposed to the virus. Smallpox vaccine was not used for many years because smallpox had been eradicated worldwide. However, concerns over the use of smallpox as a biological weapon have resulted in vaccination of persons at high risk, e.g., public health workers, health care response teams, members of the armed services. The general public is not being vaccinated. The CDC recommends that persons who could be exposed to the monkeypox virus should also be vaccinated against smallpox.
See also: vaccine
References in periodicals archive ?
"IMVANEX is not approved for monkeypox, however, in the past when smallpox vaccines were routinely administered, they were shown also to be highly efficacious in preventing monkeypox." It added: "Monkeypox is similar to human smallpox, although it is less transmissible human-to-human and less deadly with an estimated fatality rate of 1-10 per cent.
According to Damaso, "The intense mixing and exchange of several smallpox vaccine samples that occurred during the 19th century has resulted in an intricate and complex evolutionary relationship involving different types of viruses and lymphs that we are still trying to understand."
ACIP will review these recommendations as new information or developments related to orthopoxvirus disease, smallpox vaccines (including licensure of additional smallpox vaccines), smallpox vaccine adverse events, and the experience gained in the implementation of these recommendations becomes available.
Smallpox vaccine safety is dependent on T cells and not B cells.
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is considering a program that would give mandatory smallpox vaccines to everyone if they believe we're going to experience bioterrorist attacks.
These clinical studies have demonstrated that IMVAMUNE(R) induces a fast and strong immune response, which is comparable to that induced by traditional smallpox vaccines. However, the efficacy of IMVAMUNE(R) cannot be established in the clinic, because smallpox no longer exist in the general population and will have to rely on the animal rule.
Earlier in the year the government announced plans to acquire a new smallpox vaccine for persons who are immune-compromised and at risk for developing serious complications from the smallpox vaccine currently stockpiled.
Barbara Saffer's Smallpox (159-0183010) tells of the history of smallpox, using both primary and secondary source material to reveal its devastating effects in Europe, the development and dissemination of the smallpox vaccine, and the possibilities of its use as a biological weapon.
In fact, the CDC smallpox fact sheet states that it is safe for a woman to breast-feed her baby if a close contact received smallpox vaccine, provided that the vaccinee follows the standard procedures for hand washing and site protection.
The US government has already bought enough smallpox vaccine for every person in the country.
According to Damon, "This could lead to a greater evolutionary understanding of the smallpox vaccine we're using in the United States.
Folliculitis is a common and benign eruption that should be added to the list of possible cutaneous complications following administration of smallpox vaccine, reported Dr.