small-vessel vasculitis

small-vessel vasculitis

vasculitis of terminal arterioles and capillaries; characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis; causes nail fold infarcts and areas of tissue ulceration (see vasculitis)
References in periodicals archive ?
Encephalitis due to VZV infection results from small-vessel vasculitis, presenting weeks after the original infection.
2) The organism is thought to cause disease through a toxin-mediated vascular injury, resulting in small-vessel vasculitis.
Wegener granulomatosis is a form of systemic small-vessel vasculitis that most frequently involves the upper respiratory tract and lungs, with the classic triad occurring when the kidneys are also affected.
Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) [1] are associated with small-vessel vasculitis (SVV), such as Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and ChurgStrauss syndrome (l).
Predictors of relapse and treatment resistance in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodyassociated small-vessel vasculitis.
Plasmapheresis therapy for diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in patients with small-vessel vasculitis.
However, small-vessel vasculitis sited mainly in alveolar septal capillaries and small arterioles can also be encountered.
In a recent study that examined predictors of treatment resistance and relapse in subjects with ANCA-associated small-vessel vasculitis, researchers found that patients who were female, black, or had severe kidney disease, had an increased risk for treatment resistance.
The most common primary small-vessel vasculitis that occurs in adults is associated with ANCA (Mansi et at.
These recommendations are widely accepted and serve as the gold standard for detection of Wegener granulomatosis and small-vessel vasculitis.
MICROSCOPIC POLYANGIITIS (MPA) is a systemic, small-vessel vasculitis, primarily associated with necrotizing glomerulonephritis and pulmonary capillaritis.