slice

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slice

[slīs]
Etymology: OFr, esclice
(in tomography) a cross-sectional plane of the body selected for imaging.

slice

Drug slang
An eighth of an ounce of marijuana (derived from pizza, which is generally divided into 8 slices).

Imaging
(1) CT term for a single-imaged region.
(2) MRI term for the planar or selected image region.

slice

Imaging A popular term for a collimation scan interval in CT or equivalent in MRI
References in periodicals archive ?
Abstract slicing: a new approach to program slicing based on abstract interpretation and model checking.
In Section 2, we discuss the inter-procedural slicing technique, that would be useful in understanding slicing of object-oriented programs.
To facilitate the computation of inter-procedural slicing that considers the calling context, an SDG represents the flow of dependencies across call sites.
The first pass of the inter-procedural slicing algorithm traverses backward along all edges except parameter-out edges, and marks those vertices reached.
In this section, we first discuss some work on static slicing of object-oriented programs.
Static slicing of object-oriented programs has drawn considerable research interest [56, 60, 88, 87, 62, 16, 59, 57, 58, 47, 66, 41].
This representation, however, might cause the slicer to produce imprecise slices because the slice may include all the data members of the object even if a few of them affects the slicing criterion.
62] have also introduced a new concept called object slicing, which enables the user to inspect the effects of a particular object on the slicing criterion.
When slicing the object, we must obtain the complete slice first for the program.
41] proposed a new slicing algorithm for Java, which includes all dependencies between fields of nested objects but is more precise than previous algorithms [60, 88, 62].
Krishnaswamy [56] proposed a different approach to slicing object-oriented programs.
14] presented an algorithm for slicing of object-oriented programs.