sleepwalking


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sleepwalking

 
rising from bed and walking or performing other complex motor behavior during an apparent state of sleep; much mystery has been attached to this, although it is no more mysterious than dreaming. The chief difference between the two is that the sleepwalker, besides dreaming, is also using the part of the brain that stimulates walking. This usually occurs during the first third of the night and lasts for a few minutes to a half hour. The sleeper is relatively unresponsive, not easily awakened, and usually amnesic for the episode later. It is most likely to happen during periods of emotional stress and usually ceases when the source of anxiety is removed. In many cases it occurs only once or twice and does not happen again. If it recurs frequently (called sleepwalking disorder) it may stem from serious emotional distress (see sleep disorders). Called also somnambulism.
sleepwalking disorder repeated episodes of sleepwalking.

som·nam·bu·lism

(som-nam'byū-lizm),
1. A disorder of sleep involving complex motor acts that occurs primarily during the first third of the night but not during REM sleep. Synonym(s): oneirodynia activa, sleepwalking, somnambulance
2. A form of hysteria in which purposeful behavior is forgotten.
[L. somnus, sleep, + ambulo, to walk]

sleepwalking

(slēp′wô′kĭng)
n.
The act or an instance of walking or performing another activity associated with wakefulness while asleep or in a sleeplike state. Also called noctambulism, somnambulism.

sleepwalking

Somnambulism Psychiatry A sleep disorder characterized by walking or other activity while seemingly asleep Etiology, children Fatigue, sleep loss, anxiety Adults Mental disorders, drug reactions, abuse substances, alcohol, medical conditions–eg, partial complex seizures, elderly organic brain syndrome, REM behavior disorders; the activity may include sitting up and appearing awake, while actually asleep, arising and walking around, or complex activities–eg, moving furniture, going to bathroom, dressing and undressing, and other activities, including driving a car; the episode can be very brief–a few secs or mins or last for 30+ mins; sleep walkers may be confused or disoriented after awakening; injuries caused by such things as tripping and loss of balance are common for sleep walkers; SW is most common in children aged 6 to 12 yrs old and may run in families.

sleepwalking

A state of dissociated sleeping and waking common in children, especially boys, and lasting usually for only a few minutes, in which the child gets out of bed and moves about. Sleepwalking in childhood is never purposeful and is of little importance so long as danger from falls is avoided. The child should be guided gently back to bed. Sleepwalking in adults usually has a hysterical basis.
References in periodicals archive ?
They have no recollection of their sleepwalking actions, so unless they are awakened by someone else, some sleep disorders can go unnoticed for years.
The scenario sets the stage for sleepwalking, characterized by increased slow-wave sleep, particularly between stage 3 and stage 4 sleep in the first third of the night.
Though sleepwalking seems to run in families, until now scientists didn't know why.
The warning came after it emerged that Solihull man Stephen Hearn( right), who crashed his car (below right) after drinking four pints of lager, used medical evidence to prove he had been sleepwalking.
Children usually outgrow sleepwalking. Getting more sleep and not being overtired often help decrease the sleepwalking.
One such experience sometimes included in discussions of dissociative phenomena is sleepwalking, or somnambulism (e.g., Putnam, 1989, pp.
London, United Kingdom, August 07, 2019 --(PR.com)-- Writer and musician Jennifer Juan has confirmed the release of her upcoming EP, "Sleepwalking," the follow up to her May release "Subliminals," with the premiere of her latest music video, for the title track.
EU leaders have warned Theresa May that Britain is "sleepwalking" into a no-deal Brexit.
Study leader Dr Oliver Kannape, a lecturer in cognitive neuroscience at the University of Central Lancashire, said: "Traditionally, little has been known about daytime markers of sleepwalking, mostly because of the difficulty in investigating this condition experimentally.
BARRY Sheerman has begged the Prime Minister to listen, saying we are "sleepwalking like zombies" towards a bad Brexit deal.
Karissa Jayne McGarley, 26, of Wiltshire Close, Witherwack, admitted to the charge of driving while under the influence but says she was sleepwalking.