sleeping drugs

sleeping drugs

A group of drugs used to promote sleep. The group includes many BENZODIAZEPINE drugs, some ANTIHISTAMINE drugs, antidepressant drugs and chloral hydrate. The BARBITURATE drugs, once widely used for this purpose, have fallen into disrepute.
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'On her arrival at Ogunlade's residence, he allegedly gave her an overdose of sleeping drugs and strangulated her to death; and later cut off her head, two hands and burnt them for money ritual,' said Adewale.
Taking appropriate sleeping drugs, getting into the habit of rising from bed at the same time every day, and avoiding 'rajasic' (bitter, sour, salty, spicy or pungent) foods can also decrease dependence on sleeping pills, Chang added.
Malir SSP Munir Ahmed Shaikh told the media that the victim had reportedly been upset with her family and went to the farmhouse with her friends, where she was given sleeping drugs in a drink and then raped.
Sleeping drugs are normally prescribed when lack of sleep is beginning to affect general health.
For strong anxiety, sales of prescription calming and sleeping drugs such as mild antidepressants are quite common in Turkey, as the State Social Security reimburses them.
However, experts said that any attempt to wake the seven-times world champion could end up in him being in a permanent vegetative state, adding that the sleeping drugs in his body alone may take weeks to exit his system.
Glendale, CA, July 27, 2012 --(PR.com)-- At a time when the use of sleeping drugs is on the increase and their harmful side effects continue to emerge, Nutrition Breakthroughs of Glendale California is announcing an even more formidable soldier in the fight against insomnia -- a brand new reformulated Sleep Minerals II.
"But some sleeping drugs are only recommended for short-term use because they can lead to psychological dependency, and lose effectiveness over time."
Police said the murdered were administered sleeping drugs before being fired at.
Yoga users decreased the use of sleep medication by 21%, while the control group actually increased reliance on sleeping drugs by 5%.
I believe that OTC sleeping drugs are quite dangerous in the elderly.
And those efforts have a big payoff--Americans spend approximately $2 billion each year on sleeping drugs, and $20 billion on other sleep-related products.