sleep terror


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Related to sleep terror: sleep apnea, sleep paralysis, Sleep walking

night ter·rors

(nīt' ter'ŏrz),
A childhood disorder in which a child awakes screaming with fright, the distress persisting for a time during a state of semiconsciousness.

sleep terror

The abrupt awakening from sleep with behaviour consistent with terror, which is most common in preadolescent boys, but may occur in girls and extend into adulthood

sleep terror

A childhood phenomenon featuring sudden screaming, an appearance of severe agitation, apparent inability to recognize faces or surroundings, return to sleep and no subsequent memory of the event. Sleep terror appears to be harmless and ceases in adolescence. Also known as night terror.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sleep Terror Clothing's t-shirts retail for $26 on their webstore www.
Sleep Terror t-shirts are all printed on American Apparel t-shirts and retail for $26 on the website (www.
Parasomnias most likely to be encountered in clinical practice are namely, sleepwalking, sleep terrors, confusional arousals, REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and nightmares.
Sleep terrors typically are observed in children between the ages of 4 and 12 and tend to resolve spontaneously.
Looking back, their parents may see similarities between the "blood-curdling screams" and dissociative state they remember from childhood sleep terrors and the zombie-like condition of a sleepwalker.
Sleep terrors usually occur during the first third of the night and affect mostly children, who let out a blood-curdling scream and bolt upright in bed.
Other sleep disorders include sleepwalking, sleep-related asthma and sleep terrors.
Children at this age present with sleep terrors or confusional arousals, as well as moving around the bed in restless sleep in order to maintain their airway.
Our results show that there is a substantial effect of genetics factors in sleep terrors," ABC Online quoted Dr Bich Hong Nguyen, of the Sleep Disorders Centre at Montreal's Sacre-Coeur Hospital, as saying.
Non-REM parasomnias, also termed "arousal disorders", such as Confusional Arousals, Sleep Terrors, or Sleep Walking can be considered "primary sleep disorders" or "secondary" when associated with an identifiable cause such as a seizure disorder, obstructive sleep apnea, nocturnal cardiac ischemia, or nocturnal paroxysmal dystonia, for example.
Parasomnias, including sleepwalking, sleep terrors, and confusional awakening, are common in young children.