sleep inertia


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sleep inertia

The time it takes to become fully alert after waking; it is most marked in the first 10-15 minutes after awakening, but can last hours, and is worse with chronic sleep deprivation and circadian misalignment.

sleep inertia

The normal impairment in thinking and motor performance that immediately follows awakening.
See also: inertia
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The best way is to avoid sleep inertia is to ensure you get complete rest (sleep cycle) and never hit the snooze button as you wake up.
Many studies, includingonein 2001 led by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard Medical School, have found that caffeine helps with sleep inertia, making us feel more alert more quickly than we would without it.
Duration of sleep inertia after napping during simulated night work and in extended operations.
The study results showing that both hypnotic sleep medications and sleep inertia cause significant impairment have important public health implications, said Wright.
This example illustrates the body's sleep inertia. Imagine driving home after a 16-hour shift when you suddenly realize your head is bobbing.
One point of concern with any type of sleeping, while in a "ready" status, is the effects of sleep inertia. Depending on the point in the sleep cycle and the overall fatigue level, the amount of time to recover varies from one minute to four hours (Rajaratnam & Arendt, 2001).
And, for a short while at least, the effects of sleep inertia - the groggy period just after waking up - may be as bad, or even worse, than being drunk.
Coffee is particularly effective in reducing sleep inertia, the feeling of grogginess and intellectual impairment that many individuals experience immediately after awakening.
Moreover, they raised questions they were not able to answer conclusively as to whether naps of longer or shorter duration may be more effective, over what postnap period the performance effects remain, and whether sleep inertia (the grogginess experienced after waking) is a significant concern.
Known as sleep inertia, this period lasts an average of 15-20 minutes, but can last up to 2 hours in rare cases.
People woken while in slowwave sleep feel groggy, a phenomenon known as sleep inertia, which can take up to half an hour to shake off.
It is clear from this figure that the variables loading on factor 1 all showed an initial rise, reflecting a sleep inertia or 'wake-up' effect, and a rather smaller final fall reflecting a 'sleep anticipation' effect.