sleep debt


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sleep debt

The consequences of getting less than an optimal amount of sleep. These include loss of concentration, fatigue, or inadequate job performance. Most people feel and perform best with 6 to 8 hours of sleep each night.

CAUTION!

Driving a car or operating machinery after less than 5 hours of sleep increases the risk of accidents and injury.
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Sleep deprivation has become a common condition, with many adults saying they get less of the quality sleep needed because of their busy schedules and the increased screen time with the influx of smartphones, leading to what experts call sleep debt. This results in sluggishness, inability to concentrate, and can lead to health risks such as cardiovascular disease.
I could manage to keep going in California but it would take me a week to recover my sleep debt back home and I would inevitably go down with a cold.
The lure of television can push bedtimes later, and result in greater sleep debt.
Melatonin is found in the human skin, but its secretion gradually declines over time, increasing our susceptibility to sleep debt that diminishes the skin's capacity to recover from external insults.
Larson, children with chronic sleep debt have higher incidences of depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug use, and suicidal thoughts and behaviors.
A professor from Cornell University quoted that the country's national sleep debt is far more threatening than its national debt.
When we regularly get insufficient sleep on weeknights, many of us hope to repay our sleep debt by sleeping late on weekends.
A few extra hours of shut-eye on your days off work are not enough to offset your 'sleep debt' of late nights and early mornings during the week, a new study warns.
We regretfully agree that our lack of exercise, our sleep debt, faulty nutrition or excessive indulgences are to blame.
"For recovery from sleep debt, rosters need to include regular breaks of at least two nights off in a row." They also note that, according to international research, less than three per cent of permanent night workers become fully adapted to night work.
Working nights disrupts homeostatic and circadian rhythms, which leads to an accumulation of sleep debt (ie, the cumulative effect of not getting enough sleep).