sleep attack

sleep attack

Narcoleptic attack Sleep disorders A sine qua non feature of narcolepsy, consisting of an episode of irresistible sleep, which may occur at any time, but most commonly during boring or monotonous activities–eg, during lectures, driving a car, or watching TV, but also during emotional and physical exertion–eg, coitus, phone conversations
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients say it comes in waves, like a "sleep attack".
Davis, "Wireless sensor network denial of sleep attack," in Proceedings of the 6th Annual IEEE SMC Information Assurance Workshop (IAW '05), pp.
A particular devastating attack is denial of sleep attack (DS attack).
A sleep attack is described as "an event of overwhelming sleepiness that occurs without warning or with a prodrome that is sufficiently short or overpowered to prevent the patient from taking appropriate protective measure".
The Epworth Sleepiness Scale was used to survey 638 patients with the disease; 51% reported excessive daytime sleepiness, and 4% of the patients who drove reported at least one episode of a sleep attack since their diagnosis.
He felt the aura of an impending, uncontrollable sleep attack. Quickly he sat down in a front-row seat and, within seconds, was fast asleep, with his head back and his mouth wide open.
A "sleep attack" can last a few seconds or more than 30 minutes.
Shekokar, "Conservation of energy in wireless sensor network by preventing denial of sleep attack," Procedia Computer Science, vol.
For example, cataplexy may be seen without necessarily having a sleep attack, and sleep attacks do not necessarily include an episode of cataplexy.
EDS contributed 25% of the model variance, while cataplexy contributed 10%, sleep attack about 2%, sleep onset paralysis about 2% and hypnagogic hallucinations about 1%.
Sleep attacks happen intermittently and can last from seconds to minutes.
Several studies showed that dopaminergic agents (e.g., levodopa) and agonists (e.g., pramipexole, ropinirole, and rotigotine) caused somnolence.[22],[23],[24] PD patients taking a dopamine agonist were sleepier than those treated with levodopa alone.[25],[26],[27] Combination therapy with levodopa and a dopamine agonist was associated with the highest risk of EDS.[28] Furthermore, the influence of dopaminergic therapy on EDS was dose-dependent,[29],[30] and some investigators believed that PD patients who take high doses of dopaminergic therapy are prone to irresistible sleep attacks.[31]