slang

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slang

Sociology A specialized lexicon of words that are exclusive or replace other words in function, and tend to have a short life cycle. Cf Dialect, Jargon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compiled by Qasim Yaqoob and published in 2016, the book lists Urdu's slangy words, informal idioms and expressions.
In the language configuration under analysis the use of slangy language was examined that is used in 20 cases by male and female executors that are used 12 times by men and 8 times by women executors.
Written in slangy, raunchy Algerian Arabic, it was translated into Italian in 1999 by the highly capable Francesco Leggio and printed in a small bilingual edition at the author's expense.
Lawrence provides the most detailed (not to say, vivid) description of the return of Christ Himself, and gives a slangy and blasphemous account of his novella: "I wrote a story of the Resurrection where Jesus gets up and feels very sick about everything, and can't stand the old crowd anymore--so cuts out" (Collected Letters, ed.
The flavor of the very slangy dialogue, some of which has actually entered French youth jargon, will be tough to translate.
So it's great to see someone like Ifor still relishing his roots and endeavouring to keep the Welsh language, in all its multifarious slangy, colloquialistic idioms, alive and clecking.
Drew's voice has an authentic, slangy but readable ring, and his technical and vivid descriptions of game strategy and action will certainly satisfy fans of the sport.
But two generations of writers in theater, movies, and television dined out on Odets' slangy music.
But if the laddies who are the target for this sort of thing come for the pictures, they undoubtedly stay for the writing -- a swingy, slangy street vendor stew of Spanish and the indigenous Guarani.
His prose is smart, observant; and slangy and tangy (though I admit, sometimes, I wondered if his improvisations sounded a few off notes: as when he describes someone "dragging the crisp tails of one frenchfry after another through a bloodbath of ketchup" on page 23, as "bloodbath" conjures something too large and destructive for a minor event).
Like a lot of this paper's humour, the language of Dunne's strip was idiomatic and slangy, speech of a kind still heard every day, but quite oddly something that has now almost completely disappeared from contemporary comic art in this country.
I didn't want to use one of these slangy teen voices that you see in teenage fiction 'cause they're horrible and it goes out of date in five minutes.