slang

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slang

Sociology A specialized lexicon of words that are exclusive or replace other words in function, and tend to have a short life cycle. Cf Dialect, Jargon.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the language configuration under analysis the use of slangy language was examined that is used in 20 cases by male and female executors that are used 12 times by men and 8 times by women executors.
But two generations of writers in theater, movies, and television dined out on Odets' slangy music.
But if the laddies who are the target for this sort of thing come for the pictures, they undoubtedly stay for the writing -- a swingy, slangy street vendor stew of Spanish and the indigenous Guarani.
His prose is smart, observant; and slangy and tangy (though I admit, sometimes, I wondered if his improvisations sounded a few off notes: as when he describes someone "dragging the crisp tails of one frenchfry after another through a bloodbath of ketchup" on page 23, as "bloodbath" conjures something too large and destructive for a minor event).
Like a lot of this paper's humour, the language of Dunne's strip was idiomatic and slangy, speech of a kind still heard every day, but quite oddly something that has now almost completely disappeared from contemporary comic art in this country.
I didn't want to use one of these slangy teen voices that you see in teenage fiction 'cause they're horrible and it goes out of date in five minutes.
Critics might argue that, with his slangy and occasionally cliched prose, Kerouac was satirizing the glib sportswriting style of the day.
Narrator Jorge Pupo does indeed speak in a slurred, slangy way when portraying Sapo and other tough characters.
37 Slangy answer to the Roman general's query "Must I swab the floor?
You may think that nothing negative could result from sending an e-mail message Full of slangy language, misspellings, and words without capitalization to your buddy four cubicles down, but if he forwards it to his boss, and his boss forwards it to her boss, you might look like a junior high school dropout in the mind of someone deciding your next raise.
He switches easily between high-flown theoretical allusions and slangy modern as well as early modern expression.
Perhaps you think slangy language, poor capitalization, or misspellings are okay because you're e-mailing a great idea to Bob in Purchasing with whom you play basketball on the weekends.