slander

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slander

(slăn′dĕr) [LL. scandalum, cause of offense]
Defaming the character of another through injurious speech. To qualify legally for slander, speech must intentionally impugn the reputation of another and be both malicious and demonstrably false.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 1663, without explicitly referring to Carpenter or any other pastoral texts for that matter, Gearing made the very same comparison in A Bridle for the Tongue: "a slanderer may be compared to a Swine, that coming into a Garden where he seeth sweet Flowers, and stinking Ordure, neglecteth the Flowers and runs presently to the Dung" (126-27).
Veteran dissident Adam Michnik was hated by the nationalists for being another "Jewish slanderer," and even more for having been a hero of the anti-Communist struggle that most of his latter-day critics had sat out.
Therefore this spell can hardly be addressed against one human slanderer, thus explaining the common interpretation of the text.
Though skate tours have a rich history of participants verbally abusing or "capping on" one another, I defy any slanderer to compete with RVCA team manager Jimmy Arrighi.
As Linda Woodbridge observed long ago, the stage misogynist and the slanderer are a team; they work together against the virtuous women in Renaissance plays (Women and the English Renaissance, 275-99).
There then follow three case studies in the field of literature, focused on Beroald de Verville, Madame de Gournay, and Jean-Pierre Camus, which illustrate the three sides of Lucian's triangle of slanderer, audience, and victim.
To take two examples: Ilona Bell argues that the lady of the last twenty-eight sonnets is not promiscuous; that the poet is a self-interested and unreliable figure; that the primary object of his love, the "fair" but in fact contemptible young man, is both a seducer and a slanderer; and that the sequence is performative in that the earlier poems are what make the lady fall for him.
Called a drunk, a liar, a slanderer, Manescu explodes against his interrogators and then retreats into humiliated resignation, noisily shredding paper into an open mic, as the question of whose account is true ebbs into the unanswerable.
Uribe has called Petro a "slanderer," saying, "To be a mediocre guerrilla and such a lucid slanderer speaks very poorly of the character of the guerrilla," Uribe said during a speech in the Caribbean city of Cartagena, referring to Petro's time in the defunct leftist rebel group M-19, which made peace with the government in 1990.
Thus, custom says, you must be free from error; you must possess an unsullied fame: yet, if a slanderer, or a libertine, even by the most unpardonable falshoods [sic], deprive you of either reputation or repose, you have no remedy.
Fuchs suggests that Clodio, in the Persiles, represents a slanderer, who attempts to question and denigrate Auristela's origins and the truthfulness of her explanations.
Supreme Court's decision to let stand a Pennsylvania lawsuit against both a slanderer and the newspaper that printed the slander, I was not surprised by The Register-Guard's April 4 editorial opinion that these decisions were a chilling assault on the "neutral reporting privilege." I initially tended to agree with the editors.