slander


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Related to slander: Defamation of character

slander

(slăn′dĕr) [LL. scandalum, cause of offense]
Defaming the character of another through injurious speech. To qualify legally for slander, speech must intentionally impugn the reputation of another and be both malicious and demonstrably false.
References in periodicals archive ?
'When people want to kill you (politically) but cannot find any wrongdoing, they create slander,' he added.
In two separate resolutions, the DOJ indicted Kapunan for slander over her statements on the fatal hazing case against Aegis Juris Fraternity members and Patricia Bautista's disbarment case against Divina.
"Without prejudice to the crime of slander determined by the Islamic Sharia, shall be punished by imprisonment and a fine not less than Dh250,000 and not in excess of Dh500,000 or either of these two penalties whoever insults or accuses another person of a matter of which he shall be subject to punishment or being held in contempt by others, by using a computer network or an information technology means.
The ministry added that those with the blood of Palestinian children on their hands cannot slander the Turkish army.
One major benefit from decriminalizing libel and slander would be that it would reduce the value of gossip.
THE Pope's top adviser on clerical abuse has implicitly criticised the pontiff over his accusations of slander against Chilean victims, saying his words were "a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse".
Grenada election'Brothers and Sisters, you cannot accept slander, you cannot accept propaganda as politics, it's not politics, let us discuss the issue,' Thomas said, as she accepted the call by the NDC to contest the polls that political observers say will be held before the constitutional deadline.
Judge Rizk also fined the paper and its director-general for slander, libel, defamation and publishing fake news after a lawsuit was brought against Al-Akhbar by the Lebanese Forces and its chief Samir Geagea.
Instead of passing a law against fake news, the chief executive suggested an increase penalties for libel and slander.
Particularly harsh was the condemnation of slander, also called detraction, calumny, defamation, or backbiting.
Maybe a slander suit against White House aide/ fabricator Stephen Miller, and his boss, could put a stop to it.