slack

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slack

loose; not taut.

slack cap
a can of meat with one of the ends bulging slightly indicating the beginnings of a blown can.
slack loin
hollow-flanked with too much room between the last rib and the thigh.
slack pastern
too much slope in the pastern.
References in periodicals archive ?
So within Vickers's specified narrower range, about 1603-09, LION yields no non-Shakespearian instances of any of these four words, whereas, if, on the strength of Vickers's 'about', we allow slackly in Cymbeline, Shakespeare uses them all within that period.
It may be worth noting that among the slackly delineated limbs of Christ in the House of Martha and Mary (Edinburgh National Gallery), the demarcating highlights of Mary's knuckles anticipate the stippled dots of white, akin to the spotted plumage of a starling, which he was later to use to such brilliant effect in, among others, the picture of The Darymaid.
A quick glimpse into my cracked academic mirror reveals but one fragment of the problem: If I were to return to university in pursuit of an education degree, for example, I would invariably be required to begin this slackly sojourn with such courses as Introduction to Education 101.
After all, even the venerable classic, the Shih ching, had lamented: "The king's business is not to be slackly performed / And I have no leisure to nourish my father" (Ode 162).
Webs are easily rendered, torn, defiled, and then left hanging slackly.
For example, suppose a discourse contains a predicate "P" whose use is slackly disciplined.
Sometimes commentary becomes slackly impressionistic: |The passage has shape in the way that a dog's leg has shape.
We started slackly and gifted them two goals then had to work really hard for our two goals.
Yet the taut atmosphere at crunch points reveals how slackly meandering things are elsewhere.
But Wister refuses to let his hero fall under the spell of Austen: "Molly proceeded with Emma; slackly at first, but soon with the enthusiasm that Miss Austen invariably gave her.
In a nutshell: Oddly acted, slackly paced, undramatic drama.