skinfold thickness measurement

skinfold thickness measurement

A method of assessing the amount of fat under the skin by means of special calipers, sprung to exert a standard pressure and fitted with a scale. Skinfold thickness measurements may more accurately assess obesity than weighing.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the use of skinfold thickness measurement as a reliable method of body fat estimation in the newborn has been known for several years [8], it has not been sufficiently explored in Nigerian or African neonates.
Comparison of Skinfold Thickness Measurement and Bioelectrical Impedance Method for Assessment of Body Fat.
Assessment of percent body fat content in young and middle aged men; skinfold thickness measurement versus body girth methods.
Estimation of body fat by skinfold thickness measurement. Measurement can use from 3 to 9 different standard anatomical sites around the body.
Accuracy and utility of estimating lean body mass and nutritional status in patients with chronic kidney disease on long-term hemodialysis using anthropometric skinfold thickness measurements. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 45(1), 35-40.
Briefly, height (to the nearest 0.5 cm), weight (to the nearest 0.1 kg), waist and hip circumferences, and skinfold thickness measurements at four sites (biceps, triceps, subscapular, and suprailiac) were obtained.
The assessment of the body fat percentage by skinfold thickness measurements in childhood and young adolescence.
Skinfold thickness measurements are better predictors of body fat percentage than body mass index in male Spanish children and adolescents.
Yet, our review has also revealed that current prediction equations, used with skinfold thickness measurements and BIA, have either underestimated or overestimated body fat when compared to reference methods.
(65) Sarria A et al., Skinfold thickness measurements are better predictors of body fat percentage than body mass index in male Spanish children and adolescents.
Body fat percentage at time of interview was measured using two methods: (1) foot-to-foot bioelectrical impedance (TANITA); and (2) four-site skinfold thickness measurements. Bioelectrical impedance could not be used on subjects with pacemakers or internal electronic devices, representing 6 percent of cases and 4 percent of controls.