skin substitute

skin substitute

a material used to cover wounds and burns where extensive areas of skin are missing, to promote healing. Effective skin substitutes are bilaminar, with dermal analogue and epidermal analogue layers, and may be synthetic or manufactured from tissue elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PHARMA-February 16, 2018-First Patient Enrolled in Mallinckrodt's Safety and Tolerability Study of Skin Substitute
Stratatech engages in the development and commercialisation of cell-based and tissue-engineered skin substitute products for therapeutic and research applications.
The company announced in August that it had signed a cooperative research-and-development agreement with the Army Institute of Surgical Research and Rutgers University to expand development of its skin replacement product--known as engineered skin substitute (ESS)--for victims with deep partial and full-thickness burns.
At the 2014 ABA meeting, Canadian researchers reported on an autologous skin substitute that had both dermal and epidermal components.
Integra[TM] is a permanent biosynthetic skin substitute.
Excellagen is an FDA-cleared, acellular biological skin substitute designed as a professional-use advanced wound care product for the treatment of chronic non-healing diabetic foot, venous and pressure ulcers, which also has multiple additional potential tissue regeneration applications based on stem cells and other biologics.
Excellagen is an FDA-cleared, a cellular biological skin substitute designed as a professional-use advanced wound care product for the treatment of chronic non-healing diabetic foot, venous and pressure ulcers, which also has multiple additional potential tissue regeneration applications based on stem cells and other biologies.
In August, Shire announced plans to abandon its pursuit of the Dermagraft skin substitute after a clinical trial failed to pan out.
So the cultured skin substitute is going to abolish the skin graft," he added.
Topics include aggregating brain cell cultures for neurotoxicity tests, markers for an in vitro skin substitute, alternatives for absorption testing, and a liposome assay for evaluating the ocular toxicity of chemicals.
Surgeons had to remove the skin from her face and use an artificial skin substitute and grafts from her body.
But staff at a specialist burns centre at the University of California managed to cover her entire body with a skin substitute, called TransCyte.