skin self-examination


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skin self-examination (SSE)

the practice of studying one's own skin for early signs of premalignant or malignant tumors. A 5-year study by the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York found that people who examined themselves, looking for moles that change color, shape, or size, were 44% less likely to die of melanoma than those who did not.
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Skin self-examination practices in a convenience sample of US university students.
Efficacy of skin self-examination practices for early melanoma detection.
An overlooked benefit of follow-up examinations is the opportunity to identify and educate family members who often do not realize that they need to protect themselves and perform regular skin self-examinations.
Patients who have learned how to perform skin self-examinations are moderately accurate at discerning new lesions and recognizing whether changes have appeared, Mohsin Malik, M.
Thorough skin self-examinations increase the amount of health service resources that patients use, but they also save a small amount of money; Dr.
Conducting thorough skin self-examinations increases the amount of health service resources that patients use, but it also saves a small amount of money, Dr.
Almost half (45%) of those who were not performing thorough skin self-examination before the program reported doing so after receiving their digital images.
But only one in four survey participants said that their health care providers had recommended skin self-examination.
Dr al-Homsi said that limiting sun exposure, conducting regular skin self-examinations and having check-ups with a healthcare provider are important factors in reducing one's risk of developing skin cancer.
Dr Homsi says that limiting sun exposure, conducting regular skin self-examinations and having check-ups with a healthcare provider are important factors in reducing one's risk of developing skin cancer.
Al Homsi says that limiting sun exposure, conducting regular skin self-examinations, and having check-ups with a healthcare provider are important factors in reducing one's risk of developing skin cancer.
We hope to promote skin self-examinations and getting people into the doctor early because that can be the difference between life and death for melanoma," said Susan Swetter, MD, Director of the Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program at Stanford Hospital & Clinics and Professor of Dermatology.