skin autofluorescence

skin autofluorescence

The abnormal fluorescence of the skin of patients with either diabetes mellitus or excessive oxidative stress when exposed to ultraviolet light. It results from the accumulation of advanced glycosylation end products (AGE) in tissues. AGE accumulation has been linked to cardiovascular diseases, impairments in glucose tolerance, and renal failure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glycation associated skin autofluorescence and skin elasticity are related to chronological age and body mass index of healthy subjects.
Simultaneously, during last followup, we measured the advanced glycation end products (AGE) in the skin autofluorescence (SAF), using AGE Reader by Diagnoptics in order to assess the risk of diabetes mellitus development as a possible cause of the dyschromatopsia in fellow eyes without fundoscopic changes and with good visual acuity.
AGE accumulation can be assessed by skin autofluorescence (SAF) following the principles of AGE Reader, which is a validated and noninvasive technique.
Skin autofluorescence, a measurement of cutaneous advanced glycation end products, can be used as a screening method in detecting unknown diabetes.
Skin autofluorescence (SAF) measure is a promising noninvasive method to evaluate AGE deposition which correlated with AGE levels determined by biochemical analysis of skin biopsies [38].
Skin autofluorescence, relatively simple and time saving procedure, is related to the accumulation of AGE products and is one of the strongest markers to predict cardiovascular events in diabetes, renal insufficiency, and atherosclerosis itself [5].
The comparison of skin autofluorescence intensity image and image of autofluorescence photobleaching rates, both extracted from the skin video at UV-illumination, is illustrated at Fig.
Reconstruction of in vivo skin autofluorescence spectrum from microscopic properties by Monte Carlo simulation.
Palcic, "Recon struction of in vivo skin autofluorescence spectrum from microscopic properties by Monte Carlo simulation," Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B, vol.
COPENHAGEN -- Skin autofluorescence is a strong and independent predictor of mortality in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes, according to data presented at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.
Using the same properties, a noninvasive method has been developed for assessing accumulation of AGEs in dermal proteins by measuring skin autofluorescence with a dedicated device.