skeleton

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skeleton

 [skel´ĕ-ton]
the hardened tissues forming the supporting framework of an animal body; see skeletal system.
axial skeleton (skeleton axia´le) the bones of the cranium, vertebral column, ribs, and sternum.

skel·e·ton

(skel'ĕ-tŏn),
1. The bony framework of the body in vertebrates (endoskeleton) or the hard outer envelope of insects (exoskeleton or dermoskeleton).
2. All the dry parts remaining after the destruction and removal of the soft parts; this includes ligaments and cartilages as well as bones.
3. All the bones of the body taken collectively.
4. A rigid or semirigid nonosseous structure that functions as the supporting framework of a particular structure.
[G. skeletos, dried, ntr. skeleton, a mummy, a skeleton]

skeleton

(skĕl′ĭ-tn)
n.
a. The internal structure that protects and supports the soft organs, tissues, and other parts of a vertebrate organism, and is composed of bone and cartilage or, in certain animals, cartilage alone.
b. The hard external structure that supports, protects, or contains the body of many invertebrates, such as mollusks, crustaceans, and corals, and certain vertebrates, such as turtles.

menopause

Change of life, climacteric, 'time of life'  Gynecology The cessation of menstrual activity due to failure to form ovarian follicles, which normally occurs age 45–50 Clinical Menstrual irregularity, vasomotor instability, 'hot flashes', irritability or psychosis, ↑ weight, painful breasts, dyspareunia, ↑/↓ libido, atrophy of urogenital epithelium and skin, ASHD, MI, strokes and osteoporosis–which can be lessened by HRT. See Estrogen replacement therapy, Hot flashes, Male menopause, Premature ovarian failure, Premature menopause. Cf Menarche.
Menopause–”…what a drag it is getting old.” Jagger, Richards
Bladder Cystourethritis, frequency/urgency, stress incontinence
Breasts ↓ Size, softer consistency, sagging
Cardiovascular Angina, ASHD, CAD
Endocrine Hot flashes
Mucocutaneous Atrophy, dryness, pruritus, facial hirsutism, dry mouth
Neurologic Psychological, sleep disturbances
Pelvic floor Uterovaginal prolapse
Skeleton  Osteoporosis, fractures, low back pain
Vagina Bloody discharge, dyspareunia, vaginitis
Vocal cords Deepened voice
Vulva  Atrophy, dystrophy, pruritus

skel·e·ton

(skel'ĕ-tŏn)
1. [TA] The bony framework of the body in vertebrates (endoskeleton) or the hard outer envelope of insects (exoskeleton or dermoskeleton).
2. All the dry parts remaining after the destruction and removal of the soft parts; this includes ligaments and cartilages as well as bones.
3. All the bones of the body taken collectively.
4. A rigid or semirigid nonosseous structure that functions as the supporting framework of a particular structure.
[G. skeletos, dried, ntr. skeleton, a mummy, a skeleton]

skeleton

(skĕl′ĕt-ŏn) [Gr., a dried-up body]
Enlarge picture
SKELETON: anterior view of the axial (bone colored) and appendicular (blue colored) skeleton
The bony framework of the body consisting of 206 bones: 80 axial or trunk and 126 of the limbs (appendicular). This number does not include teeth or sesamoid bones other than the patella. See: illustration; table

appendicular skeleton

The bones that make up the shoulder girdle, upper extremities, pelvis, and lower extremities.

axial skeleton

Bones of the head and trunk.

cartilaginous skeleton

The part of the skeleton formed by cartilage; in the adult, the cartilage of the ribs and joints. Cartilage is more flexible and resistant to resorption due to pressure than bone.
Axial (80 bones)Appendicular (126 bones)
HeadTrunkUpper ExtremitiesLower Extremities
(29 bones)(51 bones)(64 bones)(62 bones)
Cranial (8) Frontal—1 Parietal—2 Occipital—1 Temporal—2 Sphenoid—1 Ethmoid—1 Facial (14) Maxilla—2 Mandible—1 Zygoma—2 Lacrimal—2 Nasal—2 Turbinate—2 Vomer—1 Palatine—2 Hyoid (1) Auditory ossicles (6) Malleus—2 Incus—2 Stapes—2Vertebrae (26) Cervical—7 Thoracic—12 Lumbar—5 Sacrum—1 Coccyx—1 Ribs (24) True rib—14 False rib—6 Floating rib—4 Sternum (1)Arms and shoulders (10) Clavicle—2 Scapula—2 Humerus—2 Radius—2 Ulna—2 Wrists (16) Scaphoid—2 Lunate—2 Triquetrum—2 Pisiform—2 Trapezium—2 Trapezoid—2 Capitate—2 Hamate—2 Hands (38) Metacarpal 10 Phalanx (finger bones)—28Legs and hips (10) Innominate or hip bone (fusion of the ilium, ischium, and pubis)—2 Femur—2 Tibia—2 Fibula—2 Patella (kneecap)—2 Ankles (14) Talus—2 Calcaneus (heel bone)—2 Navicular—2 Cuboid—2 Cuneiform, internal—2 Cuneiform, middle—2 Cuneiform, external—2 Feet (38) Metatarsal—10 Phalanx (toe bones)—28

skeleton

The framework of usually 206 articulated bones that give the body its general shape, and provides support and attachments for the muscles. The skeleton also provides varying degrees of protection for the internal organs.

skeleton

any structure present in an organism that maintains its shape and supports the structures associated with the body. It can take the form of an internal bony skeleton as in vertebrates, an external calcareous or chitinous exoskeleton as in arthropods, a hydrostatic skeleton as in jellyfish, earthworms etc., or of a subcellular system of support (see CYTOSKELETON).

skel·e·ton

(skel'ĕ-tŏn) [TA]
1. Bony body framework in vertebrates.
2. All dry parts remaining after destruction and removal of soft parts; includes ligaments and cartilages as well as bones.
3. All bones of body taken collectively.
4. Rigid or semirigid nonosseous structure that functions as supporting framework of a particular structure.
[G. skeletos, dried, ntr. skeleton, a mummy, a skeleton]