skeletal traction


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Related to skeletal traction: skin traction

skel·e·tal trac·tion

traction pull on a bone structure mediated through a pin or wire inserted into the bone to reduce a fracture of long bones.
Synonym(s): skeletal extension

skeletal traction

one of the two basic kinds of traction used in orthopedics for the treatment of fractured bones and the correction of orthopedic abnormalities. Skeletal traction is applied to the affected structure by a metal pin or wire inserted into the structure and attached to traction ropes. Skeletal traction is often used when continuous traction is desired to immobilize, position, and align a fractured bone properly during the healing process. Infection of the pin tract is one of the complications that may develop with skeletal traction, and careful scrutiny of pin sites is an important precaution. Some common signs of infection of the pin tracts are erythema, drainage, noxious odor, pin slippage, temperature elevation, and pain. Superficial infection of pin tracts is often treated with antibiotic therapy. Deeper infections usually require pin removal and antibiotic therapy. Compare skin traction. See also Dunlop skeletal traction.

skeletal traction

Pin traction Orthopedics Traction first achieved with tongs, followed by wire–eg, a K wire or pin–eg, Steinmann pin, placement in a bone–eg, tibia, femur and weights suspended therefrom to maintain proper alignment of the Fx. See Traction Physical therapy A technique that may relieve pain linked to certain neck disorders–eg, muscle spasm, nerve root compression, osteoarthritis, cervical spondylosis, myofascial syndrome, facet joint dysfunction; cervical traction–CT applies a stretch to muscles, ligaments, and tissue components of the cervical spine, providing relief by promoting separation of the intervertebral joint space, which contains the disc and may reduce bulging or impingement of structures in the foramen; it is not indicated for conditions of instability–eg, whiplash injuries; CT is most commonly used when the Pt is in the supine position–lying on the back with knees bent at a 45º with the neck placed at 20º-30º of flexion–forward tilt; traction in this position helps stretch the posterior neck muscles and facilitate intervertebral separation, relieving pressure that may be pinching nerves, promoting muscle relaxation and intervertebral separation.

skel·e·tal trac·tion

(skel'ĕ-tăl trak'shŭn)
Therapeutic pulling on a bone structure mediated through pin or wire inserted into the bone to reduce a fracture of long bones.
Synonym(s): skeletal extension.

skeletal traction

bone pin insertion, together with application of sustained tension via an external apparatus, to promote bone growth (see Ilizarov frame)
References in periodicals archive ?
The treatment with skeletal traction is indicated, when there is massive swelling of the elbow making it impossible to palpate normal bony points.
Displaced supracondylar humerus fractures in children, a comparison of results and costs in patients treated by skeletal traction versus percutaneous pinning.
The duration was slightly higher than those patients managed surgically because few patients managed by skeletal traction method.
This comprised of skeletal traction, manipulation of fracture and external immobilization in the form of casts and cast bracings.
Upper tibial skeletal pin traction with a steinmann or Derham pin drilled under local anesthesia followed by continuous traction given over Bohler-Braun splint for fracture lower end of femur and calcaneal skeletal traction with a Steinmann or Derham pin drilled under local anesthesia followed by continuous traction given over Bohler-Braun splint for fracture upper end of tibia.
Apley (2) showed good results of union, satisfactory knee motion in lateral condyle fractures treated with skeletal traction and early mobilization.
Initial treatment considers skeletal traction for femoral fracture and plaster slab for tibial fracture.