skeletal survey


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skel·e·tal sur·vey

radiographic examination of all or selected parts of the skeleton, as for occult fractures, metastases, etc.

skeletal survey

The radiologic examination of the entire skeleton, or just the axial skeleton and large bones. 

Indications
Suspected child abuse; detection of myeloma or bone metastases from prostate and breast cancers. For detecting metastatic malignancy, skeletal surveys have been supplanted by radionuclide imaging of the skeleton (bone scans and PET-CT), which detect lesions months earlier than do plain films.

skeletal survey

Metastatic series Imaging The radiologic examination of the entire skeleton Indications Suspected child abuse, detection of bone metastases from 1º CA–eg, prostate, breast CA. See Bone scan.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Echocardiogram, skeletal survey, head ultrasound, hearing, and eye exams were normal.
The rest of skeletal survey including pelvis and skull was normal.
Bone scan or full skeletal survey is performed to stage LCH.
Hip radiographs were not consistent with congenital hip dysplasia but were interpreted as demonstrating "abnormal appearance of the proximal femurs concerning for nonaccidental trauma," and a follow-up complete skeletal survey was recommended.
But, perhaps more ominously for Willett, a skeletal survey revealed that Cassidy had a fractured wrist, which had never been treated despite being between one and six months old.
Consultant paediatric radiologist Dr Sarah Harrison was asked to look at X-rays of Elsie's chest and abdomen after she was hospitalised on May 25 and examined a full skeletal survey carried out after she died.
The diagnosis of the EVC syndrome is done based on the history, clinical examination, and skeletal survey of the individual.
Radiographic skeletal survey and radionuclide images are complementary procedures for diagnosis and documenting this type of injury [7].
"Tests, including X-rays and a full skeletal survey later showed the infant had fractures in his right arm and wrist as well as a further two groups of healing injuries, including fractures to his left arm.
Skeletal survey showed unilateral monomelic similar like lesions involving right lower limb and right iliac bone, right humerus and radius.
40 (91%) had radiologically detectable abnormalities; 35 (80%) had lytic lesions, 17 (39%) had pathological fractures, 21 (48%) had generalized osteoporosis and only 4 (9%) had normal skeletal survey. Out of 35 cases of lytic lesions, most frequent area was spine in 25 (71%) followed by skull in 23 (66%), ribs in 15 (43%), long bones in 12 (34%), pelvis in 8 (23%), clavicle in 4 (11%) and scapula in 3 (8.5%) cases.