skeletal fluorosis


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Related to skeletal fluorosis: Dental fluorosis

fluorosis

 [floo͡″ro´sis]
a condition due to ingestion of excessive amounts of fluorine or its compounds; see fluoride poisoning.
chronic endemic fluorosis that due to unusually high concentrations of fluoride, usually in the natural drinking water supply, typically causing dental fluorosis characterized by a mottled appearance of the teeth. Combined osteosclerosis and osteomalacia can also occur in occupational exposures to vapors and dust.
dental fluorosis hypoplasia of the dental enamel resulting from prolonged ingestion of drinking water containing high levels of fluoride, manifested by the condition called mottled enamel.
skeletal fluorosis skeletal changes due to long term ingestion of excessive fluoride; they may include hyperostosis, osteopetrosis, and osteoporosis.

skeletal fluorosis

skeletal changes caused by long-term ingestion of excessive fluoride, including hyperostosis, osteopetrosis, and osteoporosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In males, both skeletal and dental fluorosis was more common, and the prevalence of skeletal fluorosis increased with age.
The reported economic consequences [17] to persons affected by skeletal fluorosis should also be of concern.
Skeletal fluorosis in humans: a review of recent progress in the understanding of the disease.
Skeletal fluorosis can be defined as excessive deposition of fluoride in bone (Saraux et al.
Excess of fluoride causes dental, skeletal and non skeletal fluorosis through continued use of fluoride contaminated water, air and agriculture produce [4].
Fluorosis, a condition caused by an excessive in-take of fluoride, manifests itself in the form of dental or skeletal fluorosis, when it attacks teeth or bone respec-tively.
Given the patient's history of well-water and instant-tea consumption, radiographic findings, and increased plasma fluoride, the diagnosis of skeletal fluorosis was given.
Excess fluoride intake has been reported to produce dental and skeletal fluorosis in animals affecting teeth and bones during development.
The York review analysed 25 studies with a wide variety of outcomes, including Alzheimer's disease, impaired mental functioning, dementia, cognitive impairment, Down's syndrome, congenital malformations, mortality, infant mortality, IQ/mental retardation, anaemia during pregnancy, age at menarche, Sudden Infant Death syndrome, skeletal fluorosis and goitre.
Skeletal fluorosis, dental fluorosis, endocrine changes, neurological effects, and even death may occur with chronic overdose or acute poisoning.
Still, it would take about 10 milligrams of fluoride a day for 10 years to lead to the rare condition called skeletal fluorosis that this woman experienced.
Endemic skeletal fluorosis in children: hypocalcemia and the presence of renal resistance to parathyroid hormone.