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scald

 [skawld]
a burn caused by a hot liquid or a hot, moist vapor; to burn in such fashion.

scald

(skawld),
1. To burn by contact with a hot liquid or steam.
2. The lesion resulting from such contact.
[L. excaldo, to wash in hot water]

scald

(skawld) to burn with hot liquid or steam; a burn so produced.

scald

[skôld]
Etymology: L, calidus, hot
a burn caused by exposure of the skin to a hot liquid or vapor.

scald

(skawld)
1. To burn by contact with a hot liquid or steam.
2. The lesion resulting from such contact.
[L. excaldo, to wash in hot water]

scald

A burn caused by hot liquid or steam.

scald

tissue damage caused by applied wet heat (e.g. hot water, steam); unconscious scalding of feet and subsequent blistering/ulceration are associated with marked distal sensory neuropathy

scald

1. a burn caused by a hot liquid or a hot, moist vapor; to burn in such fashion.
2. see benign footrot.
3. alopecia, pityriasis and hair loss over the rump of the horse without dermatitis; occurs in warm wet weather when the skin is wet continuously for long periods.

milk scald
see milk scald.
sheep scald
see interdigital dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
in the same light that the skalds used in depicting it"; a humble country stream recalls two poets who had already traversed the same ground as a younger traveler-poet, Guobergur Bergsson.
They are usually dramatic dialogues in a terse, simple, archaic style that is in decided contrast to the artful poetry of the skalds.
22) The Old Norse skalds traditionally placed the body at the center of poetic imagination, as much of their metaphorics hearkened back to stories of the death of Kvasir and the genesis of poetry out of the liquid distilled from his broken form.
Lupton wrote on London and the Countrey (not Long and Country, 137), Guazzo (not Guaazo, 201) was translated in 1581, Pereda wrote Sotileza (not Sotilega, 610), Ottarsson and Askald (882) were two different skalds and not one with four names, Camus wrote The Myth of Sisyphus (not Sisphus, 968), Chatterton was dead seven years before c.
Announcement of competition: This competition comes to cleaning of Sarpsborg District Court premises in Sigvat Skalds gate 3, Sarpsborg.
Volume 2 of Guobergur Bergsson's "poetic sagas," Eins og steinn sem hafio fagar (Like Stones Polished by the Sea), is a vast collection of memoirs, portraits, nature descriptions, and personal recollections from one of Iceland's modern-day skalds.
Skalds, on the other hand, were identified by name.
The title of this book might be translated rather literally as 'Attitudes of the Vikings to the military and society, illuminated through the poems of the skalds in honour of princes'.