scald

(redirected from skald)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

scald

 [skawld]
a burn caused by a hot liquid or a hot, moist vapor; to burn in such fashion.

scald

(skawld),
1. To burn by contact with a hot liquid or steam.
2. The lesion resulting from such contact.
[L. excaldo, to wash in hot water]

scald

(skawld)
1. To burn by contact with a hot liquid or steam.
2. The lesion resulting from such contact.
[L. excaldo, to wash in hot water]

scald

A burn caused by hot liquid or steam.
References in periodicals archive ?
O Rhine-fire's goddess, This wretched trickle Of Kvasir's mead, [poetry] (The last it may be) Thy skald now poureth; Still praying pardon For fainting heart And tongue grown feeble, Since nought he helpeth Nor holpen is he.
Soy de estirpe de skalds. En tu ditirambo apodaste agua de la espada a la sangre y batalla de hombres a la batalla.
(10) On the subject, see Julian Meldon D'Arcy, Scottish Skalds and Sagamen.
This is a moving article in demonstrating Morris's protracted and indeed brilliant efforts to recreate the intricate forms employed by Norse skalds within another, alternative, tongue.
John Lindow's contribution deals with memory techniques (narrative, objects, sites, and ritual) embedded in the Poetic Edda, as a means for examining aspects of Old Norse mythology, while Margaret Clunies Ross and Kate Heslop both write about the poet's role in cultural memory; the former looking at the skalds work as authentication, while the latter is concerned explicitly with the rhetoric and vocabulary for remembering.
Frequent 'Who's Who' paragraphs clarify the relationship between the gods and highlight significant poets or skalds. Further information bites show mythical links between different cultures and may be useful in sparking interest in which myths and legends have influenced our own traditional stories.
The first is "St Olaf and the Skalds" by John Lindow.
The arrangement of named skalds is chronological; a small final section treats anonymous poetry and anonymous lausavisur.
Waugh (ed.) The faces of Orkney: stones, skalds and saints: 128-37.
There is also a Christian/pagan opposition in the narrative itself: Snorri is a Christian who tells his story from a Christian perspective, but the verses that he uses as sources and quotes from to illustrate his narrative are presumably by pagan skalds. Hence we have the provocative image of a Christian king who is carried off to Valhalla upon his death.
The Icelandic landscape, the seasons, wildlife, rivers, glaciers, and streams of an ancient land, and the skalds and poets of the past, all figure importantly in Stigar.
45-56, and Formation of the Medieval West, passim, attempt to see performers described as scurri or mimi in the sources as professional performers of oral poetry on the line of the Scandinavian skalds, but in Notker (e.g., I:13, 17; II:21, 92) they look rather more like court jesters.