size discrimination


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Related to size discrimination: sizeism, weight discrimination

size discrimination

Discrimination against a person based largely or solely on a person’s weight, height or both.
 
Size-related phobias
• Cacomorphobia (morbid fear of fat people).
• Gigantasophobia (morbid fear of tall people). 
• Zambianoliangioticaloigisticologphobia (morbid fear of short people).

size discrimination

Sizeism, weight discrimination Vox populi Discrimination based largely–no pun intended–on a person's size. See Size acceptance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Negative stereotypes associated with fat bodies play a substantial role in size discrimination. A 2015 comprehensive literature review led by occupational therapy researcher Behdin Nowrouzi at Laurentian University, in conjunction with other Canadian researchers, revealed that overweight and obese people are commonly believed to lack self-control, to have poorer interpersonal skills and to be lazy and unhealthy.
Size discrimination on the job relates not only to wages, hiring and promotions.
We have characterized the spatial resolution of novice and expert human echolocation using size discrimination and novel, relative spatial localization tasks.
Sonar system of the blind: Size discrimination. Science, 148, 1107-1108.
Southwest Airlines is being sued for size discrimination because staff asked a man to purchase a second ticket as they felt he wouldn't fit in just one seat.
But a friend of the woman told the court how she feared she would suffer size discrimination when she went to police.
MP Paul Stinchcombe is to sponsor a motion calling for Government action to outlaw size discrimination.
"Why do people ask if size discrimination exists?" asks Williams.
Amply endowed women, sick and tired of being on the receiving end of society's cruel punches, are waging a war against size discrimination.
As the new season's collections hit the racks in Argentina, Any-Body Argentina will be there, investigating the range of standardized sizes which are offered in order to eradicate size discrimination. In a country with the second-highest rate of eating disorders in the world, where over 90 percent of women are on a diet, and more than 50 percent would like to be one dress size smaller, size-law compliance translates to greater mental and physical health for Argentine girls, teens and women.
But The Obesity Awareness And Solutions Trust (Toast) - which battles against size discrimination - described the instructions as ``appalling''.
Barrister Helen Jackson, who is fighting to change the law on "size discrimination", said: "He is not fit to be in charge of an ice-cream parlour."