situation

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sit·u·a·tion

(sich-yū-ā'shŭn),
The aggregate of biologic, psychological, and sociologic factors that affect a person's behavioral pattern.

situation

1. A set of circumstances.
2. The location of an entity in relation to other objects.
References in classic literature ?
That she was, to all appearance, in the last stage of a consumption, was--yes, in such a situation it was my greatest comfort.
The Law of Effect is that: Of several responses made to the same situation, those which are accompanied or closely followed by satisfaction to the animal will, other things being equal, be more firmly connected with the situation, so that, when it recurs, they will be more likely to recur; those which are accompanied or closely followed by discomfort to the animal will, other things being equal, have their connections with that situation weakened, so that, when it recurs, they will be less likely to occur.
Oh, I must struggle to keep this situation, whatever it might be
whether you have any reason to be discontented with your present situation.
It would be well for the eldest sister if she were equally satisfied with her situation, for a change is not very probable there.
Frank Churchill's situation, you would be able to say and do just what you have been recommending for him; and it might have a very good effect.
Wisely, therefore, do they consider union and a good national government as necessary to put and keep them in SUCH A SITUATION as, instead of INVITING war, will tend to repress and discourage it.
This peculiar felicity of situation has, in a great degree, contributed to preserve the liberty which that country to this day enjoys, in spite of the prevalent venality and corruption.
She begged her, for heaven's sake, to take care of herself, and to consider in how dangerous a situation she stood; adding, she hoped some method would be found of reconciling her to her husband.
We were then in a dangerous, helpless situation, exposed daily to perils and death amongst savages and wild beasts, not a white man in the country but ourselves.
She received me kindly, and she got me a situation in a shop.
Deane, he knew, had been very poor once; he did not want to save money slowly and retire on a moderate fortune like his uncle Glegg, but he would be like his uncle Deane--get a situation in some great house of business and rise fast.