sinus tachycardia


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tachycardia

 [tak″e-kahr´de-ah]
abnormally rapid heart rate, usually taken to be over 100 beats per minute. adj., adj tachycar´diac.
A, Sinus tachycardia; B, Ventricular tachycardia. From Chernecky, 2001.
antidromic circus movement tachycardia a supraventricular tachycardia supported by a reentry circuit that uses the atrioventricular node in the retrograde direction and an accessory pathway in the anterograde direction; this produces a broad QRS rhythm indistinguishable from ventricular tachycardia. Such a tachycardia may also use two accessory pathways (one anterograde and one retrograde) and not involve the AV node at all.
atrial tachycardia a rapid heart rate, between 140 and 250 beats per minute, with the ectopic focus in the atria and with no participation by the atrioventricular node or the sinoatrial node. It is recognizable on the electrocardiogram because the P wave precedes the QRS complex, as opposed to being merged with it or following it. This condition is usually associated with atrioventricular block or digitalis toxicity.
benign ventricular tachycardia tachycardia originating in the ventricles, not associated with structural heart disease or significant hemodynamic symptoms.
bidirectional ventricular tachycardia (bifascicular ventricular tachycardia) a ventricular arrhythmia characterized by heart rates of 90 to 160 beats per minute, alternating right and left axis deviation, ectopic focus that alternates between the anterior superior and posterior inferior fascicles, and a right bundle branch block pattern in lead V1; seen in digitalis toxicity and other conditions.
chaotic atrial tachycardia an ectopic atrial tachycardia due to multifocal activity, characterized by at least three different shapes of P waves on the electrocardiogram; often associated with chronic obstructive lung disease.
circus movement tachycardia (CMT) a reentry circuit that uses an accessory pathway or pathways; there are two subtypes, antidromic and orthodromic circus movement tachycardia.
ectopic tachycardia rapid heart action in response to impulses arising outside the sinoatrial node.
junctional tachycardia rhythm at the rate of 100 to 140 beats per minute that arises in response to impulses originating in the atrioventricular junction, i.e., the atrioventricular node. It is often seen with digitalis toxicity and is due to triggered activity, but it may also be due to altered automaticity. In the case of digitalis toxicity, the term may be used to encompass the entire span of junctional rates with this condition, i.e., approximately 70 to 140 beats per minute.
monomorphic ventricular tachycardia a type that has a uniform beat-to-beat QRS morphology.
nonsustained ventricular tachycardia a type that terminates spontaneously within 30 seconds and does not lead to hemodynamic collapse.
orthodromic circus movement tachycardia a supraventricular tachycardia supported by a reentry circuit that uses the atrioventricular node in the anterograde direction and an accessory pathway in the retrograde direction, producing a narrow QRS complex.
orthostatic tachycardia disproportionate rapidity of the heart rate on arising from a reclining to a standing position.
paroxysmal tachycardia rapid heart action that starts and stops abruptly.
paroxysmal atrial tachycardia paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.
paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) a narrow QRS tachycardia that begins and ends abruptly; it may be terminated with a vagal maneuver. It has two common mechanisms, atrioventricular nodal reentry and circus movement that uses the atrioventricular node anterogradely and an accessory pathway retrogradely. On the electrocardiogram it is characterized by abrupt onset, and mechanisms are differentiated by the relation of the P wave to the QRS complex.
polymorphic ventricular tachycardia a type that has a constantly, and sometimes subtly, changing beat-to-beat QRS configuration.
potentially malignant ventricular tachycardia a type that is not associated with structural heart disease or hemodynamically important cardiac symptoms but is sometimes associated with left ventricular dysfunction.
sinus tachycardia (ST) a rapid rhythm originating in the sinoatrial node with a rate of usually 100 to 160 beats per minute; conduction through the ventricles is normal. During exercise or stress this is normal, but if it occurs during rest it is abnormal.
supraventricular tachycardia a combination of junctional tachycardia and atrial tachycardia.
sustained ventricular tachycardia tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds and leads to hemodynamic collapse.
ventricular tachycardia an abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm with aberrant ventricular excitation, characterized by at least three consecutive ventricular complexes of more than 100 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle and is most often associated with atrioventricular dissociation.

si·nus tach·y·car·di·a

tachycardia originating in the sinus node.

sinus tachycardia

Etymology: L, sinus, hollow; Gk, tachys, fast, kardia, heart
a rapid heartbeat generated by discharge of the sinus node. The rate is generally 100-180 beats/min in the adult, although most clinicians would be suspicious of a rate of 90 beats/min or higher. Sinus tachycardia is also indicated by a heart rate greater than 200 beats/min in an infant and 140-200 beats/min in a child. Sinus tachycardia is the body's normal response to exertion, congestive heart failure, cardiogenic shock, acute pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and infarct extension.

sinus tachycardia

Cardiology A heart rate triggered by the sinoatrial node at > 90 beats/min, usually in response to exogenous factors–eg, pain, fever, thyroid hormone, stress, hypoxia, stimulants–eg, caffeine, cocaine, amphetamines; ST may indicate heart failure, valve disease or other disease. Cf Sinus bradycardia.

si·nus tach·y·car·di·a

(sī'nŭs tak'i-kahr'dē-ă)
A heart rate exceeding 100 beats per minute with a normal rhythm.

sinus tachycardia

A fast regular, heart rate caused by a high rate of pacing by the SINOATRIAL NODE. This is a normal feature of exertion and may be caused by anxiety, fever, HYPERTHYROIDISM and other disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not necessary to document VA dissociation as 1:1 retrograde conduction is well described, broadening the differential diagnosis to include sinus tachycardia with first-degree AV block or other tachycardias.
After 5 weeks in the hospital, the patient had improved; her electrocardiogram was normal except for sinus tachycardia (Figure 2), and she was discharged to inpatient hospice care on numerous medications, including electrolyte replacement.
His 12-lead ECG showed sinus tachycardia with ST-segment depression in V2-V6, I, II, aVF and ST-segment elevation in a VR.
In the OPTIC Study, amiodarone plus beta blocker significantly reduced appropriate, inappropriate and total number of shocks by suppressing ventricular tachycardia, sinus tachycardia and supraventricular arrhythmias.
Thus, in this and other patients, sinus tachycardia with new or old bundle branch block is the cause of a regular wide-QRS tachycardia that may masquerade as ventricular tachycardia.
Hyperthyroidism commonly causes cardiovascular manifestations such as, sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation and atrial or ventricular premature complexes.
Cardiac monitoring showed sinus tachycardia with a heart rate of 135 beats/min.
Jude Medical dual-chamber ICDs are designed to distinguish difficult rhythms, such as 1:1 retrograde VT from sinus tachycardia.
Electrocardiogram was consistent with sinus tachycardia and echocardiography showed left ventricular dilatation with ejection fraction 30%.
52 seconds) that could be ventricular tachycardia but is probably sinus tachycardia with right bundle branch block and a northwest QRS axis (Figure 1).
Through this exclusive combination, Photon ICDs are designed to distinguish difficult rhythms, such as 1:1 retrograde VT from sinus tachycardia.