sinus arrest


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si·nus ar·rest

cessation of sinus activity; the ventricles may continue to beat under ectopic atrial, A-V junctional, or idioventricular control.
See also: sinus standstill, atrial standstill.

sinus arrest

A form of sinus-node dysfunction (sick sinus syndrome) characterised by a normal P-wave axis. 

EKG
Every P wave is followed QRS complexes and accompanied by pauses of > 3 sec without atrial activity.

sinus arrest

Sinus pause Cardiology A form of sinus-node dysfunction–sick sinus syndrome characterized by a normal P-wave axis EKG Every P wave is followed QRS complexes and accompanied by pauses of > 3 sec without atrial activity. See Sick sinus syndrome.

si·nus ar·rest

(sī'nŭs ă-rest')
Cessation of sinuatrial activity; the ventricles may continue to beat under ectopic atrial, atrioventricular junctional, or idioventricular control.
References in periodicals archive ?
Telemetry tracings at the time of the episode was reviewed and showed bradycardia and 6-second sinus arrests [Figure 1].
Sinus arrest, requiring placement of permanent cardiac pacemaker, has also been described in the literature in association with LMS [7, 8].
The sole serious complication revolved a patient who experienced syncope and sinus arrest 16 minutes after receiving Apokyn.
Treatment of myasthenia gravis with reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors like pyridostigmine may be associated with potential side effects such as bradyarrhythmias and in rare cases complete asystole and sinus arrest. These patients can initially be managed with hyoscyamine, a muscarinic antagonist.
Of 28 dogs, 21 (75%) showed electrocardiographic changes (Table 1) such as sinus tachycardia, sinus arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, 2nd degree Mobitz type B heart block, right bundle branch block, atrial premature complex, ST depression, ST elevation and complex changes as sinus arrest with LVC, sinus arrest with VPC, sinus arrest with ST elevation and LVC, VPC, broad QRS with tachycardia (Fig.
A sinus arrest lasting longer than 3 seconds are generally considered abnormal and are suggestive of an underlying abnormality (1).
Although the recent American Heart Association guidelines support the use of atropine for treatment of asystole (14), Ferlitsch and colleagues (10) observed that patients recovered spontaneously from alcohol induced sinus arrest after stopping the ethanol injection, without any pharmacological intervention.