singlet state


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sin·glet state

a transient, excited state of a molecule (for example, of chlorophyll, on absorbing light) in which a molecule can release energy as heat or light (fluorescence) and thus return to its initial (ground) state; it may alternatively assume a slightly more stable but still excited state (triplet state), with an electron still dislocated as before but with reversed spin.

singlet state

[sing′glit]
a state of an atom or molecule in which all electrons have paired spins.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Imagine, now, that a pair of electrons is prepared in the singlet state, and that the electrons then fly apart, arriving at locations where their respective spins are measured by two observers, the proverbial Alice and Bob, in certain chosen directions.
Suppose (following Mermin [1985]) that we have a sequence of pairs of electrons in the singlet state which fly off in opposite directions, and then have their spins measured by Alice and Bob respectively.
Such a theory, if it is to be viable, must entail that a spin measurement carried out on either of two electrons prepared in the singlet state will precipitate a collapse involving both, thereby projecting them into opposite spin eigenstates.
Take, by way of illustration, the singlet state (3), and consider the state.
Suppose, once again, that we have two electrons, 1 and 2, in the singlet state, and that their spins are being measured, respectively, by Alice and Bob (A and B for short).
In theorem 1, I will consider 129 well-chosen quantum mechanical perfect anticorrelations of the spin singlet state [psi].
Due to the spherical symmetry of the quantum spin singlet state [psi], the same argument applies to any orthogonal triad of directions [theta]' = {x', y', z'}.
As discussed in Section 4, Near-Perfect Correlations requires a hidden-variable theory to incorporate, at least approximately, the perfect anticorrelations of the quantum spin-1 singlet state.
Most large molecules have singlet ground states, and excitation leads to excited singlet states.