single-unit transfusion

single-unit transfusion

The transfusion of a single unit of packed red cells.
 
Transfusion of a single unit fell into disfavour, with the rationale that if a single unit of blood is adequate (assuming a normal sized adult), then the transfusion was unnecessary; however, single unit transfusion is an increasingly acceptable practice if judicious administration of one unit avoids transfusion of multiple units.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gupte and Shaw [10] found that of 4485 female patients 549 (12.24%) were given single-unit transfusion whereas of 3985 male 394 (9.88%) received the same.
Percentage of single-unit transfusion in this study was 55.65.
There is scope for improvement of blood transfusion practices by strictly following the indications for use of blood, promoting the preparation and use of blood components, use of plasma expanders for acute blood loss, avoiding single-unit transfusions, promoting the use of autologous blood during routine surgery, regular auditing of transfusion practices, and improved communication between the clinicians and laboratory physicians.
requests for single-unit transfusion, fresh blood transfusion, use of whole blood etc.
Single-unit transfusion of whole blood in the public hospital was seen mainly in the Gyne/Obs followed by Orthopedics.
In the private hospital, maximal single-unit transfusion was by the Surgical Department followed by the orthopedics.
Although WHO7 suggests that that there is no benefit in transfusing 1 unit of RCC, as it is insufficient to correct anaemia, a study conducted in Canada to address the role of single-unit transfusions as a blood-saving technique revealed that a single-unit transfusion strategy could be an effective, simple, practical and cost-saving method of reducing the risks associated with allogenic blood exposure.10 Transfusion of a single unit should not be considered inappropriate by itself.
In 1992, the American College of Physicians published a series of guidelines titled "Practice Strategies for Elective Red Blood Cell Transfusions." (18) Among the key points of these guidelines were the avoidance of an empiric transfusion threshold and the appropriateness under certain circumstances of single-unit transfusion. The use of PRBC transfusion was specifically considered appropriate in patients with acute anemia whose symptoms were related to blood loss and were refractory to crystalloid infusions, as well as in patients with chronic anemia in whom nontransfusion therapies (eg, iron replacement, erythropoietin) had not been effective.
For example, we've found a surprisingly high number of single-unit transfusions. Eventually, we'll have the clear patterns of data needed to attempt transfusion-practice changes.

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