sinew

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sinew

 [sin´u]
a tendon of a muscle.
weeping sinew an encysted ganglion, chiefly on the back of the hand, containing synovial fluid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn), [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is the part of the muscle (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when determining the length of a muscle, the tendon length is included as well as the fleshy part; it consists of fascicles of densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): tendo [TA], sinew
[L. tendo]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sinew

(sĭn′yo͞o)
n.
A tendon.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when the length of a muscle is determined, the tendon length is included; it consists of fascicles of very densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): sinew, tendo.
[L. tendo]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sinew

A popular term for a TENDON.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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Bravo's first scripted series, Girlfriends' Guide To Divorce, falls neatly into the high-heels and messy personal lives demographic, but its main character, Abby McCarthy, played by House M.D's Lisa Edelstein (and yes, Abby is Jewish; the McCarthy comes from her philandering and directionless soon-to-be ex-husband, whose father is in fact Jewish despite the surname) is significantly smarter, more successful, and much more stylish than her sinewy and ongepotchket reality counterparts.