sinew

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sinew

 [sin´u]
a tendon of a muscle.
weeping sinew an encysted ganglion, chiefly on the back of the hand, containing synovial fluid.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn), [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is the part of the muscle (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when determining the length of a muscle, the tendon length is included as well as the fleshy part; it consists of fascicles of densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): tendo [TA], sinew
[L. tendo]

sinew

/sin·ew/ (sin´u) a tendon of a muscle.
weeping sinew  an encysted ganglion, chiefly on the back of the hand, containing synovial fluid.

sinew

(sĭn′yo͞o)
n.
A tendon.

sinew

[sin′yo̅o̅]
Etymology: ME, sinewe
the tendon of a muscle, such as the thick, flattened tendon attached to the short head of the biceps brachii. See also tendon.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when the length of a muscle is determined, the tendon length is included; it consists of fascicles of very densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): sinew, tendo.
[L. tendo]

sinew

A popular term for a TENDON.

sinew

a tendon.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mabon Madonna Wisdom reigns upon a wooden throne with eyes alone for tribal mysteries, the Master lad upon her lap, bone and sinews hers, now teaching with expertise in the temple near the hill.
The rapid delineation of muscles and sinews, the visible pentimenti and the variable thickness of the chalk lines indicate a purposeful exploration of the physical possibilities of the medium in accurately depicting the human body.
Around 1860 and 1870, before work on the construction of the two northeast terminals began, these poverty-stricken quarters were forcibly cleared and vast quantities of soil, together with the bones buried in them [the previous page shows a contemporary photograph of four skulls unearthed by workers], were dug up and removed, so that the railway lines, which on the engineers' plans looked like muscles and sinews in an anatomical atlas [the adjacent page provides one such blueprint], could be brought to the outskirts of the City.
They would, in fact, do well to heed the entreaty of Shakespeare's Henry V, who opted to "imitate the action of the tiger, stiffen the sinews, conjure up the blood.
This obscenity - masquerading as an art show - features real corpses stripped of their bones, organs and sinews and preserved by a unique plasticising process.
Indeed, Gregory argues in an early chapter that, contrary to emerging ex nihilo in the sixteenth century, these beliefs carried deep connections with those of previous centuries, when concerns with suffering, dying, Christ's passion, as well as martyrdom "coursed through the veins and strengthened the sinews of late medieval Christianity" (73).
At its heart, after all, are the tough sinews of software code connected to the dry bones of servers and silicon wafers.
HERE'S a sight to stiffen the sinews of every sixty-something wannabe rogue male.
Shared by his wife Margarita and by his colleagues, that work was fundamentally concerned with maintaining the sinews of life in the face of almost overwhelming human suffering.
Feel the warmth of bread, the sinews of fishing nets.
Barber, with the practiced eye of an experienced cloth-maker, notices that the frayed ends of the strings prove it's definitely made of twisted fibers, not hide or animal sinews.