sinew


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sinew

 [sin´u]
a tendon of a muscle.
weeping sinew an encysted ganglion, chiefly on the back of the hand, containing synovial fluid.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn), [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that is the part of the muscle (some authorities, however, consider it as part of the muscle complex), which connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when determining the length of a muscle, the tendon length is included as well as the fleshy part; it consists of fascicles of densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): tendo [TA], sinew
[L. tendo]

sinew

/sin·ew/ (sin´u) a tendon of a muscle.
weeping sinew  an encysted ganglion, chiefly on the back of the hand, containing synovial fluid.

sinew

(sĭn′yo͞o)
n.
A tendon.

sinew

[sin′yo̅o̅]
Etymology: ME, sinewe
the tendon of a muscle, such as the thick, flattened tendon attached to the short head of the biceps brachii. See also tendon.

ten·don

(ten'dŏn) [TA]
A nondistensible fibrous cord or band of variable length that connects the fleshy (contractile) part of muscle with its bony attachment or other structure; it may unite with the fleshy part of the muscle at its extremity or may run along the side or in the center of the fleshy part for a longer or shorter distance, receiving the muscular fibers along its border; when the length of a muscle is determined, the tendon length is included; it consists of fascicles of very densely arranged, almost parallel collagenous fibers, rows of elongated fibrocytes, and a minimum of ground substance.
Synonym(s): sinew, tendo.
[L. tendo]

sinew

A popular term for a TENDON.

sinew

a tendon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Supplies: Paper, scissors, #2 Glover's needle, sinew, lighter or matches, gloves, leather shears, ruler, carpenter's square, binder clips, pencil, leather, hammer, stone.
Trim up the chicken livers by removing any white sinew and green markings from the meat; it takes only a few seconds and removes any bitterness or toughness.
In the Copenhagen context, the idea of an art museum in a sylvan setting has obvious parallels with the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, just up the coast, but where Louisiana is a discreet, almost Japanese presence in the landscape, Hadid's concrete and glass sinew is a powerful topographic gesture that thrusts through groves of trees, lustily in thrall to its own zeitgeist.
Pigs and chickens gone, the farm out back will be measured to straw and sinew.
Alternate tyger sinew with lamb squares (approximately 1/4th
For a rack of lamb to be called "French trimmed" the fat and sinew has to be removed and the vertebra separated from between the bones you then have a top quality roasting joint.
Every single government minister and every backbencher, of whatever party, should be straining every sinew to stave off unemployment and help the jobless find work.
They twist their melodic-minded indie rock's every muscle and sinew from scattergun power to string-wracked swirly soundscapes.
Pork fillet takes little time to cook and once trimmed of its fine silver sinew has little or no fat on it.
Horses going head to head, bursting every sinew to win.
But where there's a bit of sinew here and there, it's best to just pull (or cut) it aside and eat the remaining non-sinuous meat.
Though sleek in sinew and sure in speed, the delivery of six men in colorful tank tops seemed no more than a flashy streak (accompanied by industrial sounds) until Joseph Poulson and Keith Thompson deepened emotion in a slow exploration of contact that seemed bolder than bravado.