simple goiter


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sim·ple goi·ter

thyroid enlargement unaccompanied by constitutional effects, for example, hypo- or hyperthyroidism, commonly caused by inadequate dietary intake of iodine.

simple goiter

Etymology: L, simplex, not mixed, guttur, sore throat
a goiter not accompanied by signs or symptoms of hyperthyroidism.

simple goiter

Endocrinology A goiter caused by ↓ thyroid hormone, resulting in compensatory hypertrophy Types Endemic–aka colloid goiter, sporadic

sim·ple goi·ter

(simp'ĕl goy'tĕr)
Thyroid enlargement unaccompanied by constitutional effects, e.g., hypo- or hyperthyroidism, commonly caused by inadequate dietary intake of iodine.

sim·ple goi·ter

(simp'ĕl goy'tĕr)
Thyroid enlargement unaccompanied by constitutional effects, commonly caused by inadequate dietary intake of iodine.
References in periodicals archive ?
But this relief and clearing up of simple goiter is only a part of the health benefits of the new balanced ration.
Some of the pupils objected slightly to the bitter salt taste; but they didn't insist upon their opposition when it was discovered that in about three months' time the number of simple goiters among them--that is to say, of enlargement of the thyroid gland, which could readily be seen--had decreased from seventy-five to about twenty; and further trial showed that this improvement could be increased to complete cure by keeping up the remedy in the same doses for about six weeks twice each year.
Gaby blamed iodine for simple goiter in children when in fact iodine is used to prevent and treat childhood goiter.
The Use of Inorganic, non-radioactive Iodine/Iodide in Simple Goiter
With the availability of thyroid extracts in the early 1900s and thyroid hormones in the 1930s, thyroidologists started using these preparations in patients with iodine deficiency and simple goiter instead of the previously used inorganic iodine/iodide preparations.
4] became the uncontested winner in the treatment of simple goiter and hypothyroidism, caused by iodine deficiency and goitrogens, but the female patients became the real losers with increasing prevalence of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cancers of the breast and thyroid glands.
Formerly the surgical school led by Kocher opposed the use of iodine in any form of Graves' disease, holding that it increases the severity of the symptoms and may, in fact, be responsible for the development of exophthalmic from simple goiter.
In that list, no mention was made of urine I levels, when in fact, the most common cause of simple goiter worldwide is I deficiency.
Hintze et al (8) compared the response of patients with simple goiter to administration of I at 400 [micro]g/day or [T.
The presence of simple goiter in a female patient is an indication of I deficiency of both the thyroid and mammary glands.