silicotic


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silicotic

(sĭl-ĭ-kŏt′ĭk)
1. Relating to silicosis.
2. One affected with silicosis.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
For silicotic Tri-State miners in the late 1920s and early 1930s, knowledge did not bring justice.
Nontuberculous mycobacteria disease accounts for a considerable proportion of the mycobacterial disease seen in silicotic patients, especially in the industrialized world, and has also been linked to worsening the clinical course of silicosis (ATS 1997a; Corbett et al.
Each of the 10 workers had histories of occupational exposure to silica and a chest radiograph consistent with pneumoconiosis; eight had a lung tissue pathology report of silicotic nodules or silicotic alveolar proteinosis [2].
Coal macules, coal nodules, and silicotic nodules were graded into absent, mild, moderate, and severe categories based on the size and profusion of lesions within the tissue sections, as previously described.
Histologically, however, the progressive development of stellate interstitial fibrous lesions is observed with mixed dust fibrosis, (1) in contrast to the classic silicotic nodules that occur with silicosis.
We describe 4 cases of right middle lobe (RML) syndrome associated with obstructive silicotic nodules of bronchial mucosa.
Shin-Etsu Silicotics have been widely used to improve the quality and effectiveness of products ranging from foundation and make-up products to skin care, liair care and sunscreens.
Koo, "Diagnosis of perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated microscopic polyangiitis in silicotics: case report," Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol.
150; Alan Derickson, 'Industrial refugees: The migration of silicotics from the mines of North America and South Africa in the early 20th century', Labor History, vol.
Second, recent research suggests that young silicotics are, indeed, more likely to die quickly from the disease.
(9) See Gill Burke, "Disease, Labour Migration and Technological Change: The Case of the Cornish Miners," in Weindling, ed., The Social History of Occupational Health, 78-88; and Alan Derickson, "Industrial Refugees: The Migration of Silicotics From the Mines of North America and South Africa in the Early 20th Century," Labor History, 29 (1998), 66-89.