silent ischemia


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Related to silent ischemia: silent myocardial ischemia

si·lent is·che·mi·a

myocardial ischemia without accompanying signs or symptoms of angina pectoris; can be detected by ECG and other lab techniques.
See also: silent myocardial infarction.

silent ischemia

Etymology: L, silere, to be silent
an asymptomatic form of myocardial ischemia that may damage the heart muscle. Ischemia is most likely to occur during the first 6 hours after a person awakens in the morning. It is triggered by mental arousal in more than 75% of patients. In contrast, cardiac ischemia accompanied by anginal pains is usually triggered by physical exertion.

si·lent is·che·mi·a

(sīlĕnt is-kēmē-ă)
Myocardial ischemia without accompanying signs or symptoms of angina pectoris; can be detected by electrocardiographic and laboratory techniques.
References in periodicals archive ?
A new study implicates silent ischemia even more strongly than before, says Prakash C.
Deedwania speculates that stress, sticky platelets, hormones, or other, unidentified factors may lead to the higher rates of silent ischemia in the morning.
The association between silent ischemia and CAN has important implications, as reduced appreciation for ischemic pain impairs timely recognition of myocardial ischemia or infarction, hence delays appropriate therapy.
But the Swiss interventional study on silent Ischemia Type II, which followed 201 patients for 10 years after their heart attacks, showed that heart attack patients who followed their episodes with angioplasty had healthier long-term outcomes than those who just took medication.
Therefore, there is a need to use combined MPI to detect silent ischemia.
and colleagues carried out a prospective study to identify the prevalence and severity of silent ischemia in 595 hypertensive patients with and without type 2 diabetes.
Similar results favoring PM dosing were demonstrated for other key measures of efficacy, time to onset of angina and time to onset of silent ischemia.
About half had unstable angina, about 40% had stable angina, and the others had silent ischemia.
Silent ischemia is a temporary shortage of oxygen to the heart that occurs without pain.
Identifying coronary artery disease in these patients is difficult because many have no apparent "chest pain" symptoms; this so-called silent ischemia may go undiagnosed until symptoms of late-stage heart disease occur including heart attack or cardiac death.