silence

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silence

 
absence of noise; a state of producing no detectable signs or symptoms.
electrical silence in electroencephalography and electromyography, absence of measurable electrical activity in tissue.

silence

(sī′ləns)
v.tr. si·lenced, si·lencing, si·lences
Genetics To interfere with the expression of (a gene or gene segment) so that its biological function is suppressed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second stage in the process is when the oppressors launch the project of silencing and are actually able to silence some of those who raise their voice.
This suggests that proviral silencing is controlled by coordinated mechanisms involving multiple cellular pathways.
Franz Kafka (2002/1919), in his letter to his father, has provided an excellent illustration of the emotional consequences of silencing the other: "The impossibility of getting on calmly together had one more result, actually a very natural one: I lost the capacity to talk.
The new offering developed by QIAGEN provides a very broad range of optimized and validated RNAi-based gene silencing solutions and, in addition, also links such RNAi solutions with the corresponding gene expression assay used in the subsequent qPCR-based knockdown validation.
In simple terms, Rana's group made the genes in question more susceptible to silencing by making the messages they sent more readable by the RNAi tools.
Tanaka Hall, postdoctoral researcher Jeffrey Vargason, and Hungarian colleagues Jozsef Burgyan and Gyorgy Szittly elucidate the nature of viral counterdefense by solving the crystal structure of a known silencing suppressor, the tombusvirus Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV) p19 protein, in complex with a 21-nucleotide small interfering RNA (siRNA), the workhorse bit of nucleic acid that drives the silencing process.
I learned about an event called the Day of Silence Project, a national youth-led movement in which students take a vow of silence for the school day in order to protest the violence, bias, mid discrimination--the "silencing"--that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered students face in our schools every day.
While identifying many of the major issues at stake in an imperial policy on language and communication, Palmer cannily prepares the reader for her central enabling observation: in contrast to the "discourse of difference" adopted by the Spanish in their approach to, for example, the Inca and their lingua franca, Quechua, the Irish and their language were at once too dissimilar to qualify as "native" and yet not dissimilar enough to render them "exotic"; English governors, soldiers, and planters therefore had to resort to a practice of silencing and suppressing the Irish voice (like Gilbert) lest it should, in turn, supplant them.
Ever since, they've sought to understand how the silencing of almost an entire chromosome occurs.
Finally, according to Persak, by silencing others, Carlyle is able to carve out a space for himself, both in the literary and social worlds: "All other voices having been silenced, only that of the prophet remains" (Persak 49).
Specifically, I examine the notions of silence and silencing in connection with the relations of power (dominance and submissiveness) and solidarity (intimacy and distance) between these characters.