silence

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silence

 
absence of noise; a state of producing no detectable signs or symptoms.
electrical silence in electroencephalography and electromyography, absence of measurable electrical activity in tissue.

silence

(sī′ləns)
v.tr. si·lenced, si·lencing, si·lences
Genetics To interfere with the expression of (a gene or gene segment) so that its biological function is suppressed.

silence

1 absence of noise.
2 a state of producing no detectable signs or symptoms.
References in classic literature ?
She was a great and wilful lady: I had seen her once carried high on slaves' shoulders amongst the people, with uncovered face, and I had heard all men say that her beauty was extreme, silencing the reason and ravishing the heart of the beholders.
He rushed forward, groping for her mouth with a silencing hand, and the shriek died out.
The uses of silence examined here include the muted tones in Kierkegaard's fear and trembling, political silencing (such as cartographic silences in Brian Friels's translations and Becket's Cold War texts) silencing one's own voice (self-censorship, how to foster silence), fascination with the void (the image of the falling man), body language(the secret sensation of self and other, the Japanese tea ceremony as a form of contemplative ellipses), pure and uncorrupted pantomime (classical and medieval science), silenced women in Latin elegy, and speaking in "saintly silence.
4) In both of these, one must distinguish between two silence-related situations: keeping silent and silencing the other.
The SAB will provide scientific perspectives and strategic insight to enable Silence to leverage its world-leading gene silencing technologies AtuRNAi and its liver specific liposome delivery technology DBTC, in the liver disease arena.
The three patent families generally disclose methods of enhancing the silencing activity of RNAi agents through certain structural modifications.
Drawing heavily upon the work of Nelle Morton and Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the book opens with an examination of what Muers appealingly terms the "garrulous silencing of God," whereby the universe of language we employ to define God, from the colloquial to the liturgical, paradoxically confines or "silences" God.
If forcing working people to donate their hard-earned money to political causes they oppose isn't silencing their voices, then what is?
Silencing the editors and writers is not the answer.
Gene Silencing, or RNA interference (RNAi) uses target-specific sequences of short interfering RNA molecules (siRNA molecules) to knock-down, or "silence" targeted genes to infer their function.
The discovery and description of RNA silencing less than a decade ago has spawned a flood of research, revolutionizing the practice of functional genomics and leading to intensive exploration of its potential application to treat numerous diseases.