signpost


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signpost

A term which is most commonly used in the UK as a verb; to point the way, provide direction, guide.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A colleague recently synthesized signpost scent, but I don't use it in existing staging areas.
The Open Spaces Society (OSS) claimed too many public paths in the region were lacking signposts alongside metalled roads.
The mystery sign-maker behind the stunts says he wants to highlight the number of unused signposts on roads across Wales.
Signposts indicating the next town or village or which way to go at crossroads came into their own with modern roads.
CRASH: The damaged central reservation and (inset) the flattened signpost
Further, the Signpost press release contained this sentence, which I suspect never passed in front of John Payton's eyes before being published: "Digital First Media will be able to enhance their editorial coverage of local news through high-quality deals from local merchants."
ITV SignPost is the country''s largest supplier of British Sign Language on-screen services for all platforms including television, video, CD-ROM, DVD, film and the internet.
She reckons she walked as far in the wrong direction as in the right one because signposts had seemingly been tampered with by so-called revellers and the city council either hadn't noticed or couldn't be bothered to do anything about it.
Stewart Till finally left the nearly defunct Signpost Films last week, and will start Dec.
If you tend to spend more time trying to find places than actually relaxing at your desired destination, you may be interested in the Signpost Guides.
(Here Kelley has taken a page from his inaugural historiographical effort of some thirty years ago, the encyclopedic Foundations of Modern Historical Scholarship, where he distinguishes between a sixteenth-century erudite interest in customs, laws, and institutions on the one hand and a "social scientific" interest in historical models and laws on the other.) Of course, any attempt to typify the whole of Western historiography is bound to fail if pushed too far, but Kelley handles his distinction with an enviable lightness of touch, employing it more as a signpost than as a systematizing device.
All that remained was a last photograph under the signpost at John O'Groats - to record the moment.