significant financial interest


Also found in: Acronyms.

significant financial interest

A term defined by the NIH as ≥ $5000 in stock or other remuneration, or 5% ownership in a business.
 
This level of “financial interest” is thought by some to be a point at which investigators with federal grants might compromise their research ethics and slant data to favour a commercial venture in which the researcher has financial interest.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
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While the rest of us can be forgiven for our attention being distracted by the prospect of a pounds 500,000 first prize for the forthcoming National Hunt competition, there are around 50 people who still have a significant financial interest in the denouement to this year's Flat Ten To Follow.
In the event of compelling circumstances, an individual holding a significant financial interest in human subjects research may be permitted to conduct the research.
a significant financial interest that could directly and significantly affect the design, conduct, or reporting of NSF-funded research or educational activities.
All those interviewed strongly believe the majority of the board should be independent, have no significant financial interest in or dealings with the company, and have no significant financial or personal relationships with senior management.
* A member has a significant financial interest, is a member of management, or is in a position of influence in a company that is a major competitor of a client for which the member performs management consulting services.
The MoD said it would initially retain a significant financial interest in QinetiQ to ensure the taxpayer shared in any early growth in the company's value.
Beer disclosed a significant financial interest in Novacea Inc., a company with a commercial interest in the research findings.
'I would reiterate that I do not intend to leave this club, which I have served for more than 30 years and in which I continue to have a significant financial interest.'
By the 1950s Americans had significant financial interests in Cuba, whereas the majority of Cubans lived in poverty.
The Saudis also hold significant financial interests in Lebanon, whether through exposure to sovereign debt and shares in Eurobonds or shareholdings in projects and companies.

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